aisle

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Related to Checkout aisle: Checkout lane

aisle

a lateral division in a church flanking the nave or chancel

Aisle

The circulatory space flanking and parallel to the nave in a church, separated from it by a row of columns; a walkway between seats in a theater, auditorium, or other place of public assembly.

aisle

[īl]
(architecture)
A passageway between or alongside blocks of seats, as in an auditorium.
One of the parts of a basilica which are located at the sides of the nave, with each aisle separated from it by a row of columns.

aisle

1. A longitudinal passage between sections of seats in an auditorium or church.
2. In a church, the space flanking and parallel to the nave; usually separated from it by columns, intended primarily for circulation but sometimes containing seats.
References in periodicals archive ?
The advantages of plastic are well-known, and we can expect that plastic bags will be with us in the checkout aisle - and in landfills and along roads - for a "long, long time.
It would be difficult to miss a Hachette Filipacchi magazine in the checkout aisle of most any supermarket.
At Big Y supermarkets, self-scanner checkout aisles may not be gone for good.
Healthy checkout aisles have been established in area WalMart and Foodland grocery stores as well as in-store promotion of fresh fruits and vegetables (FFV) including FFV tastings.
Dozens of Internet sites offer free brainteaser puzzles, and games and inexpensive booklets are available at grocery checkout aisles and bookstores.
Asda won praise last week after saying they would withdraw sweets for sale in checkout aisles.
Now they cater to areas that have good incomes, and have fewer open checkout aisles.
I gather the items I need and then become frustrated because only one or two checkout aisles are open.
Some citizens would like to prohibit all nudity for children," says Houston, who reports getting far more complaints about Cosmopolitan and In Style magazines than Playboy, Penthouse, or Hustler, since the fashion mags line supermarket checkout aisles.
Because the checkout aisles seem to be designed for the passage of average-sized persons, either or both vehicles end up playing bumper cars with the surrounding shelving.
Susan Dellow, services director of the Greater Connecticut Chapter, reports that such an effort in the Hartford area was eminently successful, resulting in wider shopping aisles, some checkout aisles wide enough for wheelchairs or scooters, and uniform arrangement of merchandise to reduce hunting for items or reaching for frequently purchased foods such as milk, eggs and bread.