Chekhov

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Chekhov

, Chekov
Anton Pavlovich. 1860--1904, Russian dramatist and short-story writer. His plays include The Seagull (1896), Uncle Vanya (1900), The Three Sisters (1901), and The Cherry Orchard (1904)

Chekhov

 

(until 1954, Lopasnia), a city under oblast jurisdiction and administrative center of Chekhov Raion, Moscow Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the Moscow-Simferopol’ highway; railway station 77 km from Moscow. Population, 43,000 (1974). Chekhov’s industrial plants include a power engineering machine-building plant, a regeneration plant, the Gidrostal’konstruktsiia Plant, printing and furniture combines, a mixed-feed plant, and a candy factory. The city was renamed in honor of A. P. Chekhov. A literary museum-preserve memorializing the writer is located at Melikhovo, 12 km from the city.

REFERENCE

Prokin, A., and Iu. Solov’ev. Gorod Chekhov i ego okrestnosti. Moscow, 1977.

Chekhov

 

(until 1947, Noda), a city in Kholmsk Raion, Sakhalin Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the western coast of southern Sakhalin Island, along the Sea of Japan (Tatar Strait). Railway station. The city has a cellulose and paper plant, a ship repair plant, a wine and vodka plant, and a milk plant. There is also a fishing kolkhoz in the city.

References in periodicals archive ?
His theatrical experiment caused not only the failure of its premiere--in the eyes of the playwright--but that of reviewers to understand Chekhovian aesthetics.
A feeling of Chekhovian hopelessness mounting to wicked human comedy presides in her finely drawn portraits.
West criticized Du Bois only because Du Bois deserved it, not to make himself number one: "My Chekhovian Christian voice simply cuts deeper and thereby is more truthful than Du Bois's Goethean Enlightenment view that undergirded his marvelous scholarship.
It is the deftest allusion, heightened by the Chekhovian sound effects immediately following and made ironic when Act Two of Voyage opens with Liubov and her family indeed in Moscow, but only thanks to one of Stoppard's trademark time reversals.
He says in a programme note that he sees the piece as more or less Chekhovian, but perhaps it's more overtly political than that.
By Salvage's end, he has come perilously close to being an old windbag--not what Stoppard had in mind, I am sure--and his dominant mood is Chekhovian melancholy rather than the gaity so many of his friends recalled.
Henley melds Chekhovian and Wildean tones, moods, and styles in Impossible Marriage, which also alludes to Dylan Thomas's "Lament," A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Paradise Lost.
There were three such roles in Walton's The Bear, although Lauren Segal as the young widow, Popova, Jon-Paul Decosse as her rough-hewn, amorous neighbor, Smirnov, and Andrew Stewart as her servant, Luka, seemed to find it just as difficult to draw much humor from this slight Chekhovian tale (under Ashlie Corcoran's minimal direction) as the orchestra did in finding much wit in Walton's otherwise well-crafted score, under Stephen Philcox's similarly unassertive musical direction.
She has a real tragedy to relate, and she does it in Chekhovian terms.
At a deeper level, finally--drawing on diaries, private correspondence, and contemporary reminiscences and arranging her exposition in diachronic sections ("Scenes from Family Life," "The Victorian," "Pre-Raphaelite," "Artist," "Man of Letters," "Marriage," "Radicals," "The Patient," and "Coda")--Thirlwell has provided readers with an almost Chekhovian account of the passionate bonds which united "William and Lucy," as well as the mingled idealism and insecurity of Lucy Rossetti's temperament in her last valetudinarian decade.
This impressive volume has been prepared by a leading expert not only in matters Chekhovian but in the Russian theatre of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
It would seem that the director wants to link his characters to Chekhovian (anti)heroes, who suffer the cruelty of life without taking any visible action to stop it.