Cheka

(redirected from Chekist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Cheka:

see secret policesecret police,
policing organization operating in secrecy for the political purposes of its government, often with terroristic procedures. The Nature of a Secret Police
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Cheka

early Soviet secret police charged with guarding against counterrevolutionary activity. [Russ. Hist.: Benét, 190]
See: Spying
References in periodicals archive ?
25) Vladimir Socor, "Soviet Chekist, Slavic Fist, and the Medvedev-Yanukovych Declaration on Transnistria", Eurasia Daily Monitor, Volume: 7, Issue: 97, The Jamestown Foundation, 19 May 2010, accessed on 03 February 2012.
Lukas plans and executes the multiple killings of drunken Chekists and "slayers," guests at a fake engagement party.
Leading Chekist and People's Deputy Military Commissar M.
Nevertheless, as we have reported, in 2005, Putin did restore a smaller bust of the mass-murdering Chekist to a pedestal at the infamous Lubyanka headquarters of the KGB-FSB.
See "Russia's Chekist Putsch" in our February 14, 2000 issue).
Thus, for example, the Chekists did not only do a good job of keeping an eye on the country's citizens at home and abroad, as instructed by Soviet power, but also were successful in winning over to their side ethnic Russians abroad and foreigners sympathetic to Communist ideals.
if the chekists were a valiant detachment in the service of morality and ideology, why were its leaders paid ten times more than a worker?
The agents of the first Soviet secret police agency, known as the Cheka, were called Chekists, and their successors in agencies including the Soviet-era KGB and today's Federal Security Service adopted the anniversary as their professional holiday.
Stages of the complex development: appearance of private oil companies; period of large-scale privatisation, foundation of private vertically-integrated concerns and consolidation of their positions; shifts in the political elites; chekists going into offensive.
As the Soviet dissident Andrei Sinyavsky noted, "Soviet literature of the twenties and thirties reveals an odd and unusual friendship between writers and Chekists.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who, unlike Hitchens, lived in a secular Russia, has described Lenin's "achievement" with greater precision: "tens of thousands of priests, monks, and nuns, pressured by the Chekists to renounce the word of God, were tortured, shot in cellars, sent to camps, exiled to the desolate tundra of the far north, or turned out into the streets in their old age without food or shelter.
The one indication that you are an extreme enemy of the state is this: you even imply that the Soviet Chekists are liars.