Chenla


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Chenla

 

a state of the mid-sixth to the eighth century that was formed by Mon-Khmer tribes living along the middle course of the Mekong River. Chenla, first mentioned as a vassal state of Funan, was situated southwest of Lin-Yi (Champa). Isanavarman I (ruled early seventh century to c. 635) conquered Funan, having extended his authority westward to Angkor, and founded the capital of Chenla at Isanapura, on the Stung Sen. Under Jayavarman I (ruled early eighth century), the last ruler of Chenla, the state split into rival principalities. The culture of Chenla is represented by brick temples, remarkable sculpture, and numerous epigraphs in Old Khmer and Sanskrit that have been preserved.

REFERENCE

Migot, A. Kkhmery. Moscow, 1973. (Translated from French.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The sites are the Cambodia's archaeological site of Sambor Prei Kuk, the capital of the Chenla Empire that flourished in the late 6th and early 7th centuries CE, China's Kulangsu which is a tiny island located on the estuary of the Chiu-lung River, and India's walled city of Ahmadabad, founded by Sultan Ahmad Shah in the 15th century.
The Kentfield Collection Chenla Table Lamp, $1,325 Striking white glass Lamp designed by Jiun Ho for Boyd Lighting.
A good example is perhaps the Chenla, Lu Ban Hap's eccentric, abstract theatre where Sihanouk hosted his so-called international film festivals.
The Chenla has been annexed by an ugly, circular restaurant.
Murphy suggests this indicates less of a Dvaravati influence and a 'much stronger Chenla and later Khmer influence in the region, which could have made its way here by following the Mekong River, originating from the area around Sambor Prei Kuk in present day Cambodia'.
This has led researchers to suggest Chenla leaders Mahendravarman (550-611 CE) and later his son Isanavarman, invaded towns along the Mun River, appointing relatives to rule over the conquered territory.
4) The pre-Angkorian Khmer of the Chenla era inhabited the present-day border region between Laos and Cambodia during about the fifth to eighth centuries.
Khmer claims to southern Laos are more anachronistic, dating back to the presence of Khmer people in southern Laos during the Chenla and Angkor periods.
In March 1972, despite partial paralysis from a stroke the previous year and the total defeat of his Chenla II operation in which at least 3,000 Republican Army troops were killed--'a disaster that broke the spirit of the army forever'--Lon Nol moved against his remaining rivals, ousted Cheng Heng (head of state since the 1970 coup) and assumed full power over the Republic.
These polities and their respective numbers of dependencies (in brackets) are given as the following: (1) Vietnam [2]; (2) Champa [7]; (3) Chenla [5]; (4) Siam [1]; (5) Danmaling (Tambralinga?