Cheyne-Stokes respiration

(redirected from Cheyne-Stokes breathing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Cheyne-Stokes breathing: central sleep apnea, Kussmaul's breathing, Biot's breathing

Cheyne-Stokes respiration

[′chān·ē ′stōks res·pə′rā·shən]
(medicine)
Breathing characterized by periods of hyperpnea alternating with periods of apnea; rhythmic waxing and waning of respiration; occurs most commonly in older patients with heart failure and cerebrovascular disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
On polysomnography, Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern is the presence of at least 10 central apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour of sleep in which the hypopnea has a crescendo-decrescendo pattern of tidal volume accompanied by frequent arousals from asleep and occurs in association with a serious medical illness such as heart failure, stroke or renal failure (13).
Cheyne-Stokes breathing and central sleep apnea are closely linked to congestive heart failure with systolic dysfunction, relationships suspected several hundred years ago by John Hunter and John Cheyne.
3 = Not intubated, Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern.