Chiaroscuro Woodcut

Chiaroscuro Woodcut

 

a kind of color woodcut. Chiaroscuro woodcuts are produced from several blocks of woods to which closely related tones of color have been applied. The picture, created primarily by gradations of light and shade, consists of generalized forms endowed with a feeling of three-dimensionality. Chiaroscuros were invented in the 16th century (Ugo da Carpi and A. Andreani in Italy; H. Baldung in Germany).

References in periodicals archive ?
GODS AND HEROES IN THE PRINT BAY January 23 to May 25 Epic ambitions underpin this display inspired by Hercules and Caucus, the magnificent chiaroscuro woodcut by Hendrick Goltzius, recently acquired for the gallery.
GODS AND HEROES IN THE PRINT BAY January 23 to May 25 Epic ambitions underpin this display inspired by Hercules and Caucus, the magnifi-cent chiaroscuro woodcut by Hendrick Goltzius, recently acquired for the gallery.
There is a print by Hans Burgkmair and Cornelis Liefrinck, a chiaroscuro woodcut of Emperor Maximilian I (1508-18), made from two blocks.
Equally successful is the coupling of two images of the Rest on the Flight into Egypt, the line block for a chiaroscuro woodcut and the chiaroscuro woodcut made from two blocks, by Rubens and Jegher (c.
8) of 1510, the impressive chiaroscuro woodcut created during his first working period in Strasbourg.
which presented his collection of 16th-century chiaroscuro woodcuts.
Lincoln's point of departure is the role which Beccafumi's experiments with the newly invented technique of chiaroscuro woodcuts may have had on his designs for some of the inlaid pavements in Siena Cathedral.
When Georg Baselitz's collection of chiaroscuro woodcuts went on display at the Royal Academy in London last month, it reaffirmed his place in the pantheon of distinguished artist-collectors ('Renaissance Impressions: Chiaroscuro Woodcuts from the Collections of Georg Baselitz and the Albertina, Vienna'; until 8 June).
This year's event coincides with the Royal Academy's exhibition of chiaroscuro woodcuts from the collections of Georg Baselitz and the Albertina, Vienna.
This Goltzius exhibition is the first to have incorporated all aspects of his production in a whole variety of media, including prints, paintings, drawings, chiaroscuro woodcuts, and metalwork (in the form of engraved plaques).