Chicano

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Chicano

a person of Mexican origin or descent living in the US. Once a pejorative term, Chicano was adopted in the 1960s to give the (then) 8-10 million Mexican Americans an identity and political focus. ‘Chicanismo’ became a description of the movement to restore Mexican dignity culture and power.
References in periodicals archive ?
She authored several poetry collections and, with her husband, ran a small publishing house, M&A Editions, which published other Chicano authors.
Banned writers in Mexican American Literature: A Portable Anthology, include Rudolfo Anaya, Sandra Cisneros, and Luis Rodriguez, icons of Chicano storytelling.
In Revolt, which details the events of Zeta's legal defense of a number of significant cases involving Chicanos in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Acosta's ruminations on ethnicity implode essentialist and singular notions of identity by employing the figure of the cockroach.
Little Nation and Other Stories is a collection of five stories by Alejandro Morales that expands Benedict Anderson's work on "imagined communities" from Chicano perspectives.
Garcia is a professor of history and Chicano studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
The possibilities of such a challenging emergent cinema are suggested in the next chapter, "Red Sky at Morning, a Borderlands Interlude," where Melendez shows the attempt to film a project in the Southwest Borderlands about how Anglos and Chicanos viewed one another as neighbors.
En su platica con Pancho Villa, el trio llega a la conclusion que para los chicanos la cultura y la identidad no es algo que se busca porque se ha perdido.
In a similar way, in Spy Kids (2001) the location of the Chicano family in an exotic, evocative milieu immediately brings to mind the conventional representation of Latinos in Hollywood cinema, as we can see in Carmen Miranda's and Rita Hayworth's films during the so-called Good Neighbor Policy era.
Their "photopoetic" journey results in a creative mix of images and moving discourses expressed in three different art forms: the essay, poetry, and the snapshot, with Herrera's wistful and insightful narrative as the guiding meditation through a personal labyrinth, recalling his early youth in Texas, his teenage travels across the border to Michoacan, Mexico City, and Veracruz, his "migration" to New Mexico, and his lifelong desire to see Chicano superheroes save the day, fall in love, or be known as contributors to society.
Occupied America: A history of Chicanos (5th Edition).
In the end, Chicanos Studies created an infrastructure that included the National Association for Chicano Studies, its own peer-reviewed journals, and a diverse canon, that reified the process of intellectual production.
On April 29, 2010, the best known and most commercially successful play of Chicano theatre finally made its bow to Mexican stage audiences for the first time.