Chickaban

Chickaban

During Mayan month of Xul
The ancient Mayan feast known as Chickaban, observed at Mani in the Yucatán state of Mexico, was held in honor of the feathered serpent and storm god Kukulcán. Before the feast, the tribal chiefs spent five days fasting, dancing, and worshipping their idols. At the feast itself, offerings were made to Kukulcán, who came down from the sky to join them.
According to the myth, Kukulcán came to the Mayas from the west with 19 attendants, all bareheaded and wearing long robes and sandals. He built ChichÉn Itzá, the ancient Mayan city, and ruled over the four points of the compass and the four elements of air, earth, fire, and water. Kukulcán is usually depicted with a serpent's body, a jaguar's teeth, and the long plumes of the quetzal bird. He is holding a human head in his jaws and is seated on the cross-shaped symbol of the compass.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 594