Chigirin

Chigirin

(chĭgĭrēn`), Ukr. Chyhyryn, city, central Ukraine, on the Tyasmin River, a tributary of the Dnieper. Founded in 1589 as a fortress, Chigirin served as the residence of the hetman of Ukraine from 1649 (when it was so designated by the Treaty of Zborov between Hetman Bohdan ChmielnickiChmielnicki, Khmelnytskyy or Khmelnitsky, Bohdan
, c.1595–1657, hetman (leader) of Ukraine. An educated member of the Ukrainian gentry, he early joined the Ukrainian Cossacks.
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 and the Polish king) until 1687. It was thus the capital of right-bank UkraineUkraine
, Ukr. Ukraina, republic (2015 est. pop. 44,658,000), 232,046 sq mi (601,000 sq km), E Europe. It borders on Poland in the northwest; on Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, and Moldova in the southwest; on the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov in the south; on Russia in the
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. The city passed to Russia in 1795.

Chigirin

 

a city and administrative center of Chigirin Raion, Cherkassy Oblast, Ukrainian SSR. Chigirin is situated on the Tiasmin River, a tributary of the Dnieper, 36 km from the railroad station of Fundukleevka on the Znamenka-Imeni Tarasa Shevchenko line, and 63 km southeast of Cherkass. It has enterprises for the production of leather clothing accessories, furs, furniture, accessories, bricks, and foodstuffs. The city has a museum of local lore.

Chigirin has been known since the first half of the 16th century, when it was a fortified cossack wintering site. From 1648 to 1657 it was the seat of the Ukrainian hetman B. Khmel’nitskii. Chigirin was destroyed by Turkish and Tatar invaders during the Chigirin Campaigns of 1677–78. In 1795 it became a district capital in Voznesensk Province, and in 1797, a district capital in Kiev Province. In 1876–77 Chigirin District was the scene of an attempted peasant uprising under the leadership of the Narodniki (Populists).

References in classic literature ?
Rostopchin's broadsheets, headed by woodcuts of a drink shop, a potman, and a Moscow burgher called Karpushka Chigirin, "who- having been a militiaman and having had rather too much at the pub- heard that Napoleon wished to come to Moscow, grew angry, abused the French in very bad language, came out of the drink shop, and, under the sign of the eagle, began to address the assembled people," were read and discussed, together with the latest of Vasili Lvovich Pushkin's bouts rimes.
In 1886, a Kiev district court in Chigirin sentenced ten Jews to five to eight years of hard labor for "seducing" the female convert Evdokiia Shevchenkova back to Judaism.
He is at his best when he describes two cases of peasant unrest in the South, the Chigirin affair of 1877 and the Pavlovki riot of 1901, in which religious dissidents played leading roles (in the first and relatively well-studied case, this was not previously known).
Principal battles: Chigirin (near Smela) (1678); Streltsi Revolt (Moscow) (1698).
96) Brian Davies, "The Second Chigirin Campaign (1678): Late Muscovite Military Power in Transition," in The Military and Society in Russia, 100; Davies, Warfare, 162-63; Stevens, Russia's Wars, 191-92.