Childe Harold

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Childe Harold

makes pilgrimage throughout Europe for liberty and personal revelation. [Br. Lit.: “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” in Magill IV, 127–129]
See: Journey
References in periodicals archive ?
But even though Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Pride and Prejudice were not begun as close together in time as their publication dates would suggest, and even though Jane Austen had imagined and depicted Darcy long before Byron articulated Harold, the two works, their characters, and their sensibilities derive from the same era: the politically conservative, post-Revolutionary, pre-Waterloo period that might justly even in England be termed the Age of Napoleon.
Nonetheless, the artist was caught up in the backlash of Byron's savaging of Elgin in his polemical poem of 1811, 'The Curse of Minerva', and also in the introductory notes to the second canto of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, published the following year, in which Lusieri was described as 'the agent of devastation' and 'an able instrument of plunder'.
His modeling of experience in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage thus rendered him simultaneously a desiring subject and the "cool" object of desire.
To its credit, The Future of Liberalism is written in a sprightly style and embellished with excellent quotations, including a long citation from Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
Marking the 200th anniversary of Lord Byron's ventures, Everett follows his path through Spain, Greece, Albania, Turkey, Italy and Switzerland in an effort to piece together a picture of the legend who crafted such works as Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
found the text of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, and his Letters.
To solidify that goal Churchill proposed these lines from Childe Harold's Pilgrimage as inspiration:
Shooting to fame with his autobiographical poetic account of his grand tour, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, which was turned down by several publishers, it became a sudden sensation when published by John Murray, of Edinburgh.
He came to fame in March 1812 when his second book, a selection of travellers' poems, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, was published to great acclaim.
Byron became famous overnight after the publication of his 1812 poetry book Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
It was the year 1812 that a young and handsome peer, Lord Byron, returned from an extended continental tour and published a poem entitled Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
He was now at the height of his beauty and on the threshold of fame, which would come from the publication of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.