child

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child

[chīld]
(computer science)
An element that follows a given element in a data structure.
In object-oriented programming, a subclass.

child

child

(1) In database management, the data that is dependent on its parent. See parent-child.

(2) A component that is subordinate to a higher-level component. See child menu, child program and child window.

Child

(dreams)
Some people have reoccurring dreams about a small child, while others, from time to time, dream about unfamiliar children. The child in your dream could represent your inner self, or the child within. The dream could be based on childhood memories, and it may carry a specific message or bring up long-buried issues. On the other hand, the dream could simply be a pleasant memory. Children in dreams could symbolize a need and an eagerness to learn, simplicity, intuition, new endeavors, and many other positive attributes of childhood. Occasionally, the child in your dreams may be pointing to your own childish ways. Therefore, consider all of the details and the tone of the dream before making an interpretation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Child and dependent care problems are already having a serious impact on worker absenteeism, recruitment and retention--and affecting America's bottom line.
Senior executives and human resource managers tackle the question of whether business can and should get involved in the child care issue.
Companies lose good people when they can't come to work because of poor child care arrangements," argues NBCDI's Moore.
Quality child care is one of the most critical issues facing our employees," says NationsBank spokesperson Martha Larsh.
An estimated 5,600 public and private employers provide some form of child and dependent care assistance, and another 500 offer elder care assistance.
To continue attracting the most qualified workers, businesses must help employees identify viable child care options.
McLanahan and Carlson (2002) reported, in their findings from the Fragile Families Study, that 93% of the mothers in non-marital relationships wanted the father to be involved; two-thirds wanted the father involved in raising their child even when not romantically involved with the father at the time of birth.
As stated by Lin and McLanahan (2001), fathers are likely to demand more time with their child in exchange for financial remunerations.
Some studies suggest that fathers who pay child support will be more likely to visit, whereas others suggest that more visits lead to greater compliance in paying child support (Furstenberg, Nord, Peterson, & Zill, 1983; Seltzer, Schaeffer, & Charng, 1989; Teachman, 1991).
Quality of me relationship between parents after separation has been linked both to increased child support payments and increased visitation.
Exchange theory has been used in previous studies as a framework for examining the association between visiting one's children and paying child support (Seltzer, Schaeffer, & Charng, 1989; Teachman.