Chionodoxa


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Related to Chionodoxa: Puschkinia

Chionodoxa

 

(glory-of-the-snow), a genus of bulbous plants of the family Liliaceae. The leaves are radical and linear, and the flowers are in few-flowered racemes with low, leafless pedicels. The lobes of the perianth are fused at the base; the bell-shaped to funnel-shaped (or almost stellate) perianth is blue-violet, blue-purple (sometimes with an eyelet), blue, white, or pink (in cultivated forms). The stamens are free. Flowering occurs in early spring. There are about six species, found in Asia Minor and on the islands of the Eastern Mediterranean in mountains at elevations to 2,000 m. All species are decorative; most frequently cultivated is the species C. luciliae and its varieties.

References in periodicals archive ?
Chionodoxa has star-shaped flowers in blue, white or pink, while ixia's stellar blooms are orange, yellow or red.
Or if you love the wild primrose, Primula vulgaris, try it with puschkinia, sci llas or chionodoxa and anemone nemoro sa, our Or if you love the wild primrose, Primula vulgaris, try it with puschkinia, sci llas or chionodoxa and anemone nemoro sa, our native wood anemone.
Or if you love the wild primrose, Primula vulgaris, try it with puschkinia, scillas or chionodoxa and anemone nemorosa, our native wood anemone.
They'll look gorgeous when combined with other late winter/ early spring flowers such as primulas, pulmonarias and bergenias, along with some spring bulbs like snowdrops, chionodoxa and crocuses.
Snowdrops, snowflakes, crocus, muscari, chionodoxa, and other minor bulbs costs only a few cents each and are big on pleasure next spring.
In addition shallow troughs of colourful alpines on waist-high staging, including cyclamen, chionodoxa, anemone, dwarf narcissi and primulas create a riot of colour in late winter and early spring.
OFFER C: Jumbo Mixed bag of 125 bulbs comprising 10 Peacock Tulip, 35 Specie Crocus, 35 Anemone De Caen, 15 Dwarf Narcissi and 30 Chionodoxa.
Chionodoxa, or 'Glory of the Snow', are wonderful miniature plants which can liven up a corner adding a splash of dazzling blue and growing to 6in (15cm) high.
Many of the blue bulbs, chionodoxa and scilla, are perfect partners and can be encouraged to naturalise by allowing seedheads to form and scatter their seed willy-nilly.
And if you are still bulb-planting now, remember that wood anemones, scilla, chionodoxa and dwarf daffodils are all ideal for growing in grass, providing nectar for emerging bees in spring.
Chionodoxa (glory of the snow), crocus, Eranthis (winter aconite), fritillaria, Leucojum (snowflake),
They look good in groups in the centre of small containers and can also be combined with dwarf narcissi, chionodoxa and crocus in shallow bowls oversown with grass to create a natural meadow look in a container.