Chivalric Romance


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Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
She persuasively maintains that by transposing the chivalric romance source material onto a localized, Anglicized, domestic sphere, Beaumont's play responds to the peace of 1604 and to the residual, looming suspicion of Spain.
Between 1542 and 1560 the Giolito Press published a version of Ludovico Ariosto's celebrated chivalric romance the Orlando Furioso accompanied by heavy glosses by Ludovico Dolce.
The result is a close retelling of the romanzo cavalleresco, the chivalric romance.
Before the Furioso, woman warriors of the Italian Chivalric Romance tradition tended to become knights for a specific purpose.
As for the Chatsworth chivalric romance, a copy of The Deeds of Sir Gillion de Trazegnies in the Middle East, illuminated in Antwerp or Bruges and dated 1464, was acquired by the J.
The Marrow of Tradition takes place at this intersection of the literary and the legal, and the novel suggestively links the literary mode of the Southern chivalric romance to an indeterminate relation between social and political spheres.
This long chapter follows the same basic conflict through medieval romance (Chretien de Troyes's Erec et Enide), chivalric romance (Marie de France's Eliduc), late medieval Spanish tragicomedy (Fernando de Rojas's Celestina), and Baroque Spanish comedia (Calderon de la Barca's La dama duende juxtaposed with Leonor de la Cueva's La firmeza en la ausencia).
In his third chapter, "Providence, Irony, and Magic: Orlando furioso," Gregory moves from classicizing Humanist epic to a work highly indebted to chivalric romance.
Alison Grant's Act II dances lent a courtly air to this chivalric romance.
Any reader of chivalric romance will be both struck by how frequently a dwarf appears in these stories and challenged to determine why.
On the other hand, in "Livvie" the modern world has left behind the Trace as a mythical setting for frontier tales just as the Trojan War has become a chivalric romance, an ornament to decorate a wall.
Fiction is the main issue of the novel because the gentleman from La Mancha has been "unhinged"--his madness is also an allegory or symbol, ahead of a clinical diagnosis--by the fantasies of chivalric romance.