Chomsky

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Related to Chomskyan: Noam Chomsky

Chomsky

(Avram) Noam . born 1928, US linguist and political critic. His theory of language structure, transformational generative grammar, superseded the behaviourist view of Bloomfield
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In fact, it is misleading to believe that we are totally creative in the Chomskyan sense of language use because this might overburden our capacity to attend to output.
This position contrasts with the Chomskyan linguistic theory in which grammar is primary, and has the status of an independent variable in that an innate grammar is essential for language development.
Rather than presume a high degree of semantic transparency in a given encoded message, as was common to Saussurian and Chomskyan approaches to context and linguistic forms (Hanks 141), scholars in the field of anthropological linguistics have begun to focus more on the uses of, and the roles played by, language as utilized by the speaking subject (Duranti and Goodwin 1).
Key topics addressed include getting texts ready for syntactic analysis; the relevant syntactic phenomena and the sorts of concepts normally used to explain them--and how the basic categories of traditional syntactic analysis, derived from the languages that form the basis of the European tradition, need to be rethought for different languages; and the range of syntactic frameworks outside the Chomskyan tradition available to those working syntactic research.
positivist account of the law as well as in a Chomskyan approach to
Gleason introduced the concepts of agnation and enation in his 1963 textbook, Linguistics and English Grammar, which belongs to a generation of "general-structuralist" textbooks (assembling the insights which had been achieved in the major schools of structuralism), which appeared in North America and Europe in the period 1955-1965, on the verge of the emergence of more specific (post)structuralist linguistic schools, especially in Europe, and just before the rise of Chomskyan transformational-generative grammar in the US.
In New York around the same time, Peter Eisenman was leading a group of students and faculty members at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in a similar departure from previous architectural practices, searching within architecture for Chomskyan "deep structures" beyond the language of the everyday.
If we analyze English grammar in isolation, it is likely to appear much more complex, much more a matter of arbitrary and diverse rules, than if we analyze it in the context of universal grammar, specified through the setting of parameters (on the Chomskyan idea of parameters in universal grammar, see Belletti and Rizzi 2002).
The Chomskyan Turn: Generative Linguistics, Philosophy, Mathematics, and Psychology.
Specifically, Forbes' multivalent application to holistic education of the Chomskyan dichotomy of "performance" (or the decontextualized rehearsal of psychically irrelevant skills and facts) and "competence" (or the psychologically, socially and spiritually rich embedding of educational acts in the student's existential life-world) is satisfying in both its economy and intuitive "rightness.
From a Chomskyan perspective, accounting for language acquisition requires no sense of function whatsoever--such issues are thought to be peripheral to language acquisition (Chomsky, 1986) and not needed for understanding the learning of language structure (Wexler & Cullicover, 1980).
All that Chomskyan grammar can explain is language which is transparent and easily labelled: "first-order" sentences such as The keeper fed the bananas to the monkey.