villus

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Related to Chorionic villi: hydatidiform mole

villus

1. Zoology anatomy any of the numerous finger-like projections of the mucous membrane lining the small intestine of many vertebrates
2. any similar membranous process, such as any of those in the mammalian placenta
3. Botany any of various hairlike outgrowths, as from the stem of a moss

villus

[′vil·əs]
(anatomy)
A fingerlike projection from the surface of a membrane.
References in periodicals archive ?
We analysed 70 DNA samples extracted from chorionic villi of products of SM, skin fibroblasts, amniotic cells and products of curretage.
Maternal blood bathes the chorionic villi within the intervillous space, delivering nutrients and oxygen, and removes nutrient-depleted blood via maternal veins.
The extracellular matrix of chorionic villi can be decreased, and the villous cores, thus, as pale as the intervillous space (Figure 1, F).
The most important point about chorionic villi sampling or amniocentesis is the risk of Rh sensitization that it take that mother's Rh- and embryo's Rh+.
In some instances, chorionic villi sampling may do more harm than good.
As for invasive testing, 34% said that they would consider undergoing chorionic villi sampling, while 43% said that they would consider having amniocentesis.
Multiple luminal vascular abnormalities of chorionic villi, a lesion developing in placentas after fetal death, did not show correlation with placental hypoxic lesions, either villous or membranous, most likely because of the heterogeneous etiology of fetal death.
Lack of chorionic villi in a product of conception specimen has been considered in the past to be a critical diagnosis that requires immediate communication to the clinician.
Unfortunately, no homogenate of the original native chorionic villi was available for reanalyses.
The MLPA test is part of an existing kit that is already used around the world to detect chromosomal abnormalities in invasively obtained amniotic fluid or chorionic villi samples from pregnant women.
The first-trimester detection rate was 65%, with 2% of patients requiring chorionic villi sampling (CVS), and the second-trimester detection rate was 28%, with another 3% of patients requiring amniocentesis.
Genomic DNA was also extracted from chorionic villi and peripheral blood lymphocytes of both parents.