choropleth

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choropleth

[′klȯr·ə‚pleth]
(mapping)
A map showing the distribution of a phenomenon, usually using various colors; color gradations are correlated to the density per unit area of the phenomenon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, they used the choropleth map linked with the parallel coordinates in order to understand multivariate spatial characteristics.
In addition to investigating the extent to which our augmented halftone technique could be used to create tactilely distinctive classes on choropleth maps, we investigated the number of different tactile classes the participants could distinguish.
For better contrast of the point analysis of the data set relative to the choropleth maps, the vacancy data points were overlaid on top of maps of vacancy for ZIP codes and census tracts (Figure 6).
Technically, a choropleth map should be more "convenient" to make than a graduated symbol map due to widely available tools in GIS and other mapping systems; but with varying area sizes, data must be standardized before the map is produced.
To comprehend the meaning of a dynamic choropleth map, the reader must not only notice a change (Change Detection Level 1) in a particular unit, but also must understand how that unit changed over time (Change Detection Level 3).
Assessing the effect of attribute uncertainty on the robustness of choropleth map classification.
Exploremap an exploration system for choropleth maps.
The LISA cluster maps of age-adjusted mortality rates for all causes at the beginning and end of the study period recapitulate the pattern observed in the choropleth maps, but reduce the complexity so that statistically significant clusters can be more easily distinguished.
The performance of spatial interpolation methods and choropleth maps to estimate properties at points: a soil survey case study, Environmetrics 7: 1-16.
Symbols with classed variants (Aspaas and Lavin 1989) or with continuous variation in patterns (Brassel and Utano 1979) may also be used for choropleth maps.
Second to choropleth maps, the most common type of thematic representation was flow arrows.
Additionally, some cartographic methods require an equal-area base, for example, choropleth maps (showing values usually normalized by area by differently shaded areas) or dot maps (where the relative density of dots changes with a real distortion).