Christendom

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Christendom

the collective body of Christians throughout the world or throughout history
References in periodicals archive ?
This belief in the superiority of Christian nations fit neatly with Brewer's belief in the ascendancy of Anglo-American culture.
189) As such, Christian nations had a duty to act morally, like their citizens.
192) Brewer opposed American imperialism, and especially the acquisition of new territory as a result of the Spanish-American War, because Christian nations promoted peace and were fair in their dealing with other peoples.
In Brewer's assessment, Christian nations promoted freedom of belief and practice, but refrained from promoting particular religious viewpoints or seeking religious conformity.
178) See BREWER, supra note 63, at 23 (noting that Christian nations gave their citizens the "utmost freedom" and afforded the best opportunity for societal advancement).
5) Judges and commentators have panned the Christian nation pronouncement as "arrogant" and anachronistic, an "aberration," or at best, as stating a mere "truism.
11) The Christian nation declaration has also served as ready ammunition for arguments that the Court's church-state decisions since 1940 have strayed from both history and legal precedent,(12) and that Christian principles deserve (re)incorporation into the warp and woof of America's political and legal institutions.
Most modern discussions of the Christian nation declaration, both pro and con, have failed to examine the statement from the viewpoint of its author or the context within which it was written.
United States (1892) that "this is a Christian nation.
Supreme Court, elaborated on this dictum in a slender, almost forgotten volume entitled The United States: A Christian Nation (1905).
By these and other evidences," Brewer wrote, "I claim to have shown that the calling of this republic a Christian nation is not a mere presence but a recognition of an historical, legal and social truth" (p.
Students of religion in American history, in general, and the Christian nation debate, in particular, will find this volume a useful addition to their libraries.

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