Christendom

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Christendom

the collective body of Christians throughout the world or throughout history
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Other evidence of the Christian nation maxim was found in the customs and practices of the people, the text of oaths that referenced God, the near universal observance of the Sabbath and the proliferation of Christian churches and charitable organizations.
To add mystery to Brewer's motive, his discussion of the Christian nation maxim lacked a distinct polemical quality; it was as if Brewer was relating the consensus view of a historical fact.
152) Through two works in particular, American Citizenship(153) and The United States A Christian Nation,(154) both based on a series of college lectures, Brewer expanded on the themes presented in Holy Trinity.
So it is that we are regarded among the nations of the world as a Christian nation.
169) In this sense, America was considered a Christian nation in order to distinguish it from non-Christian cultures that existed in other parts of the world.
Assuming this is what Brewer meant when he referred to America as a Christian nation, his rationale for integrating the maxim into the Holy Trinity decision becomes clearer.
222) In a related vein, Brewer likely included the Christian nation discussion as a way of answering critics and naysayers who claimed that Christianity was no longer relevant.
Brewer believed strongly that two important attributes of a Christian nation were a respect for religious diversity and separation of church and state.
In Brewer's opinion, the right to believe and practice the religion of one's choice--or not to believe--was central to those freedoms epitomized by a Christian nation.
239) However, Brewer's own understanding of separation--he opposed financial support for religion but supported Sunday laws and the limited use of the Bible in public school classrooms--becomes less important than the fact that he clearly saw the principle of church-state separation as characteristic of a Christian nation, if not one of its highest manifestations.
Despite Brewer's abiding interest in the Christian nation maxim, he did not make his meaning clear in Holy Trinity.
Initial public reaction to Holy Trinity and the Christian nation declaration was negligible.

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