evangelism

(redirected from Christian evangelism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Christian evangelism: evangelist

evangelism

1. (in Protestant churches) the practice of spreading the Christian gospel
2. the work, methods, or characteristic outlook of a revivalist or evangelist preacher

evangelism

the emphasis ofcertain Protestant sects on personal conversion and faith in atonement through the death of Christ as a means of salvation. The political and social influence of mass evangelism is usually conservative in nature.

Evangelism

Gantry, Elmer
fire and brimstone, fraudulent revivalist. [Am. Lit.: Elmer Gantry]
John
disciple closest to Jesus. [N.T.: John]
Luke
early Christian; the “beloved physician.” [N.T.: Luke]
Mark
Christian apostle. [N.T.: Mark]
Matthew
one of the twelve disciples. [N.T.: Matthew]
References in periodicals archive ?
This election year -- three years after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks -- ATS and Christian evangelism stand at the forefront of one of the most open mission fields we've seen, and we're stepping up to the plate this fall to meet the opportunity and the need," Southern said recently, "at the Pentagon, with voter registration, and with our traditional Halloween tracts and treat evangelism resources.
Christian evangelism, Islamic da'wah, and the Buddhist invitation to "come and see" need to be distinguished by proponents of these religions from coercive or deceptive "proselytism.
Donald Posterski distinguished proselytism, which he defined as including manipulation, enticement, or coercion to get persons to change their beliefs, from Christian evangelism, which celebrates religious freedom and respects the basic right to change one's beliefs.
Bob Fowler specializes in bringing fundamentalist Christian evangelism to kids.
Urban Christians 159,600,000 660,800,000 CHRISTIAN EVANGELISM 73.
They assert close and enduring historical connections between a triad of tabshir, isti'mar, and ishtiraq--that is, Christian evangelism, Western imperialism, and Orientalist scholarship on Islam and Muslims.
And why did the Muslim authors of these works portray Christian evangelism as such a grave threat to Islam and Muslims, condemning even the social services that early twentieth-century missionaries provided to develop modern schools, ameliorate public health, extend mass literacy, and so on?
Contrary to missionaries' hopes, therefore, conversion out of Islam never became a mass movement, even in the first quarter of the twentieth century, when the social, political, and economic climate of colonialism was most conducive to Christian evangelism.
While the Muslim authors of all these works condemn Christian evangelism as a tool of Western imperialism, they differ in political outlook.
The author traces Christian evangelism to the military failures of the original Crusader wars, and argues that Christian missionaries are neo-Crusaders bent on destroying Islam and conquering the world.
In the view of this writer, the "evil powers" include a trio of Orientalism, Christian evangelism, and Western imperialism, or alternately, of Crusaderism, Communism, and Zionism.
Urban Christians 159,600,000 CHRISTIAN EVANGELISM 74.

Full browser ?