Christine de Pisan

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Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).

Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
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Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
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Christine de Pizan presents the rather astounding case of an Italian-born woman who was commissioned to write the official biography of a French king.
Christine de Pizan and the Moral Defence of Women focuses on five prose works produced between 1399 and 1405: the querelle de la "Rose" (1401-2), the Othea (1399-1400), the Avision-Christine (end of 1405), The Book of the City of Ladies, and The Book of the Three Virtues.
All of the authors/translators that I discuss here feel free to alter their sources, often broadly, and Christine de Pizan, taking Petrarch's Epistolae seniles 17.
Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies: Christine de Pizan, ed.
On Christine's refusal of the role of loving narrator see Brownlee's "Discourses of the Self: Christine de Pizan and the Rose," Romanic Review 79 (1988): 199-221: and Barbara K.
Hanley blends exposing the deceptions surrounding the development and use of the Salic Law, showing yet one more aspect of what she calls the "misogynist litany"; a valuable side-benefit is to reinforce the profound significance of Christine de Pizan, whose feminist research and writing is here shown to have had potential, if aborted, political significance beyond the usual reading of her oeuvre.
Dans cette oeuvre si saisissante qu'est le Livre de la cite des dames, Christine de Pizan consacre un chapitre au viol.
She then addresses the idea that the queen lacked political acumen in ruling a feuding country during her husband's incapacitation from insanity, tracing the evolution of the myths and why they have been so resistant to challenge and showing how she was really a mediator queen, illustrated in the example of the struggle for physical possession of the dauphin Louis in 1405 and the intervention of Christine de Pizan.
She also has a 700-level seminar course on Christine de Pizan and directs the BA Hons dissertations of these students.
The text's investigation of female agency is built on the legacy of Christine de Pizan and Alain Chartier; there is also much thematically to anticipate Marguerite de Navarre's Heptameron (the second--1535--edition of the text was produced at the latter's request).
Contexts and Continuities: Proceedings of the 4th International Colloquium on Christine de Pizan (Glasgow 21-27 July 2000), in honour of Liliane Dulac.
La Reecriture d'une metaphore utopique: les sources bibliques de Christine de Pizan dans La Cite des dames.