Chromaticism


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Chromaticism

 

the augmenting or diminishing, by a semitone, of a degree in a diatonic scale, thereby heightening the degree’s tendency to gravitate toward an adjacent degree. A chromatic semitone lies between a diatonic degree and its augmented or diminished variant. The difference between a chromatic semitone and a diatonic semitone is that the notes of the chromatic semitone belong to a single degree; thus, the chromatic semitone C–C sharp contrasts with the diatonic semitone C–D flat. Chromatic alteration is indicated by signs of alteration, or accidentals. Alteration is more common than chromaticism, since every chromaticism is an alteration, but not every alteration is chromatic; an alteration in C major, for example, may lead to the establishment of a new key. Chromatic alteration is a real change in a diatonic degree in one voice; alteration occurs when the diatonic variant of that degree is given before the altered note in another voice or does not precede it at all.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some slanting of the evidence in favor of the views of Edward Lowinsky (on musica ficta and chromaticism, chiefly) is to be found; it was certainly to be expected.
It uses the chromaticism of Monk's theme and creates variations on it.
The similarities are obvious (prevailing half-note motion in the vocal lines, tremolo-style quarter-notes in the bass), but the father's chromaticism is far more complex by means of a polyhonic texture with uncompromising and difficult-to-sing intervals.
Indeed, his work, despite its vital chromaticism and fiery tonalities, is visually cold, as the paintings are based on photographs of television screens whose images have been optically distorted.
Barber too removes himself from the preceding recitative by setting the text with a stately melodic line in common time, which together with its complaisant chromaticism bears a similarity to many a Victorian hymn (see fig.
And broad in its composition too, with Barber drawing on a host of twentieth century innovations: extreme chromaticism, serialism and jazz harmonies.
This collection contains exciting contemporary pieces (solos and duets) by seven leading FJH composers that will open up a world of new sounds through bitonality, chromaticism, jazz harmonies, mixed meters, ostinato patterns, whole tone scales, aleatoric writing and unique pedal effects.
Despite being one of the few Czech painters since Franbisck Kupka to have successfully explored the expressive possibilities of color, after 1973 Simotova appears to have abandoned both painting and, for the most part, intense chromaticism.
McClelland defines Umbra as a musical topic having "dark and brooding tonality, angular lines, prominent dotted rhythms and syncopations, unexpected dissonances and chromaticism, and awe-inspiring timbres provided by unusual orchestration, especially in the use of trombones" (p.
Impressionism, chromaticism, dance forms, and an interest in nature are influences woven into Koechlin's character pieces.
Wagnerian harmonic richness, particularly the piercing chromaticism of Parsifal, blends with arias of an almost Verdian passionate fervour (the tender interchange between the Soul of Gerontius and his Guardian Angel could almost pass as a love duet), the solos punctuated by choruses of vivid dramatic character.
His embroidered dresses, shopping bags, and pillowcases, made from translucent, softly colored material, possess the texture and chromaticism of painting.