Chryseis


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Chryseis

(krīsē`ĭs), in the Iliad, a woman captured by Agamemnon. When ransom efforts failed, her father, the priest Chryses, appealed to Apollo, who promptly sent a plague to terrorize the Greek army; when Agamemnon released Chryseis, he took Briseis from Achilles and instigated the quarrel between them. In later times, her story was retold by Chaucer in Troilus and Crisyde and Shakespeare in Troilus and Cressida.
References in classic literature ?
But of this we will take thought hereafter; for the present, let us draw a ship into the sea, and find a crew for her expressly; let us put a hecatomb on board, and let us send Chryseis also; further, let some chief man among us be in command, either Ajax, or Idomeneus, or yourself, son of Peleus, mighty warrior that you are, that we may offer sacrifice and appease the the anger of the god.
I care neither for you nor for your anger; and thus will I do: since Phoebus Apollo is taking Chryseis from me, I shall send her with my ship and my followers, but I shall come to your tent and take your own prize Briseis, that you may learn how much stronger I am than you are, and that another may fear to set himself up as equal or comparable with me.
He escorted Chryseis on board and sent moreover a hecatomb for the god.
The sons of the Achaeans shared it duly among themselves, and chose lovely Chryseis as the meed of Agamemnon; but Chryses, priest of Apollo, came to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and brought with him a great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo, wreathed with a suppliant's wreath, and he besought the Achaeans, but most of all the two sons of Atreus who were their chiefs.
They then got out upon the sea-shore and landed the hecatomb for Apollo; Chryseis also left the ship, and Ulysses led her to the altar to deliver her into the hands of her father.
15) who with the lord Apollo and the Rivers have youths in their keeping -- to this charge Zeus appointed them -- Peitho, and Admete, and Ianthe, and Electra, and Doris, and Prymno, and Urania divine in form, Hippo, Clymene, Rhodea, and Callirrhoe, Zeuxo and Clytie, and Idyia, and Pasithoe, Plexaura, and Galaxaura, and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe and handsome Polydora, Cerceis lovely of form, and soft eyed Pluto, Perseis, Ianeira, Acaste, Xanthe, Petraea the fair, Menestho, and Europa, Metis, and Eurynome, and Telesto saffron-clad, Chryseis and Asia and charming Calypso, Eudora, and Tyche, Amphirho, and Ocyrrhoe, and Styx who is the chiefest of them all.
Agamemnon declares that, as the gods demand Chryseis, his war-prize, he will in turn call for Briseis, Achilles' own war-prize.
Handily one of the little Tans is called Chryseis, which rhymes with 'crisis'.
6) But the case of Chryseis here illustrates the tendency in competitive systems to attach a physical definition to the term honour, and it becomes a common noun denoting a medal, prize money, promotion, or whatever, and loses its force as an abstract noun.
Compare this with Achilles's first words upon hearing Agamemnon's desire for Chryseis, the captive Trojan woman originally won by Achilles: "Shameless-- / armored in shamelessness--always shrewd with greed
After the ship bearing Chryseis leaves, Achilles asks his mother, the goddess Thetis, to spite Agamemnon by intervening with Zeus in favor of a temporary Trojan victory.
Agamemnon has lost his concubine, Chryseis, and takes as compensation Achilles' "prize of honour," Briseis.