Chrysoprase


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chrysoprase

[′kris·ə‚prāz]
(mineralogy)
An apple-green variety of chalcedony that contains nickel; used as a gem. Also known as green chalcedony.

Chrysoprase

 

a mineral; a green variety of chalcedony (see), with the color ranging from emerald green to grass and apple green, caused by microinclusions of nickel silicates. Chrysoprase has a vitreous or greasy luster. It is translucent and sometimes opalescent. In large segregations the degree of translucence and intensity of color varies. Chrysoprase occurs in the form of veins and veinlets in the weathering crust of ultrabasic rocks. Its formation is believed to be caused by hypergenic processes of chemical weathering of dunites and serpentinites or with the hydrothermal alteration of these rocks.

Chrysoprase is an attractive gem and semiprecious stone. It has been known and mined in Europe since the 14th century and was extensively used in the 17th and 18th centuries to make jewelry, church utensils, Florentine mosaics, and inlays. The largest deposit now being worked is at Marlborough in Australia; other deposits are found in Poland, the United States, and Brazil. In the USSR chrysoprase occurs in the Urals and in Kazakhstan.

chrysoprase

put in mouth, renders bearer invisible. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 67–68]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 18th century a deposit of good quality chrysoprase was discovered in Silesia (western Poland).
Chrysoprase was also popular in Victorian times, its hardness making it ideal for carving into cameos and intaglios, as well as for beads and cabochons, the Victorian jewellers making use of the Silesian material.
And here too the twelve gates are matched in number by the twlelve jewels that make up the fabric of the walls: chrysolite, sapphire, beryl, chalcedony, jacinth, amethyst, sardonyx, jasper, sardius, topaz, emerald, chrysoprase, all the jewels of the apocalyptic vision are carefully listed (851--65).
The collection consists of bracelets that are resplendent with diamonds, beautifully faceted Capri cut coloured stones such as amethyst or stunning rich colours of cabochon, chrysoprase and orange moonstones that are complemented by black sapphires or other precious stones in pave settings.
January - garnet or rose quarter February - amethyst or onyx March - aquamarine or bloodstone April - diamond or rock crystal May - emerald or chrysoprase June - alexadrite or moonstone or pearl July - ruby or carmelion August - peridot or sardonyx September - sapphire or lapis October - opal or tourmaline November - topaz or citrine December - zircon or turquoise
chrysolites and beryls and chrysoprases and rubies .