Chulym

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Chulym

(cho͞olĭm`), river, c.1,075 mi (1,730 km) long, Krasnoyarsk Territory, S central Siberian Russia. It rises in the eastern slopes of the Kuznetsk Alatau and flows N and W through Krasnoyarsk Territory and Tomsk region into the Ob. Its lower course is navigable. Another Chulym River, 140 mi (225 km) long, in SW Siberia, feeds Lake Chany.

Chulym

 

a city and the administrative center of Chulym Raion, Novosibirsk Oblast, RSFSR; situated on the Chulym River. Chulym has a railroad station on the Barabinsk-Novosibirsk line, 131 km west of Novosibirsk. The city has a creamery and enterprises serving railroad transportation.


Chulym

 

a river in Novosibirsk Oblast, RSFSR. The Chulym is 392 km long and drains an area of 17,900 sq km. It rises in the swamps of the Baraba Steppe, and its lower course passes through Lakes Sargul’ (34.6 sq km) and Urium (84.1 sq km) before emptying into Lake Malye Chany. The Chulym is fed mainly by snow. High water occurs between mid-April and early November. The river is frozen from December to March, and the ice breaks up in April or early May. The Kargat is a right tributary of the river. The city of Chulym is situated on the Chulym.


Chulym

 

a river in Krasnoiarsk Krai and Tomsk Oblast, RSFSR; a right tributary of the Ob’.

The Chulym is 1,799 km long and drains an area of 134,000 sq km. It is formed by the confluence of the Belyi Iius and Chernyi Iius rivers, which rise in the Kuznetskii Alatau. From its source to the city of Achinsk the river flows through mountains, but from Achinsk to Tegul’det it flows first between high banks and then through the Chulym-Enisei Basin, where it branches and frequently shifts course. The Chulym then flows over a floodplain up to 10 km wide, where it forms numerous lakes and oxbows; the channel, which is up to 1,200 m wide, has many branches.

The Chulym is fed primarily by snow, with high water occurring between May and July. The mean flow rate is 785 cu m per sec, with a maximum rate of 8,220 cu m per sec (131 km from the mouth) and a minimum rate of 108 cu m per sec. The river freezes over in early November, and the ice breaks up in late April or early May; ice jams often occur in the spring. The average sediment discharge is 68 kg per sec, and the river carries a sediment load of 2.1 million tons per year. The largest tributaries are the Serezh, Uriup, Kiia, and Iaia on the left and the Kemchug, Chichkaiul, and Bol’shoi Ului on the right.

The Chulym is used for floating timber. The river is navigable for a distance of 1,173 km from the mouth; however, the river bars and the twisting course make navigation difficult. The cities of Nazarovo, Achinsk, and Asino are situated on the Chulym.

References in periodicals archive ?
247) Geumgangsan gwangwangjigu chulim, cheryu, geojugyujeong [Geumgangsan Regulations on Transit, Immigration, and Residency], 2004, art.