Chun Doo Hwan

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Chun Doo Hwan

(jûn dō hwän), 1931–, Korean military leader, president of South Korea (1980–88). An army officer, Chun rose to power in a coup following the murder (1979) of South Korean President Park Chung HeePark Chung Hee
, 1917–79, president (1963–79) of the Republic of Korea (South Korea). Starting (1940) his military career in the Japanese army, he joined the new South Korean army after the establishment of Korean independence at the end of World War II and rose
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. As president, Chun banned many of his opponents from politics and passed (1980) a new authoritarian constitution. In 1981 he lifted martial law, in effect since 1979. In 1987 he picked Roh Tae Woo to be his party's presidential candidate and subsequently endorsed Roh's democratization policies. Chun and Roh were both indicted in 1995 and 1996 on corruption charges, as well as for their roles in the 1979 coup and in the massacre of prodemocracy demonstrators in Gwangju (Kwangju) in 1980. Sentenced to life in prison, Chun was pardoned in Dec., 1997, by President Kim Dae JungKim Dae Jung
, 1924–2009, president (1998–2003) of South Korea. A native of South Jeolla prov., Kim was a long-time campaigner for increased democracy and a writer on international issues.
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, as a national reconciliation gesture.
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Department of Justice on Thursday said that it had filed a civil forfeiture complaint case seeking to recover more than 700,000 dollars in corruption proceeds linked to former president of the Republic of Korea Chun Doo-hwan.
Two former presidents, Roh Tae-woo and Chun Doo-hwan, were prosecuted; another, Roh Moo-hyun, committed suicide.
Korean dictator Chun Doo-hwan (1980-1987) had restricted the media's ability to report on corruption by using the Basic Press Law (BPL) to force newspapers to follow Ministry of Culture and Information (MOCI) reporting guidelines.
Also convicted of crimes against humanity were Korea's Chun Doo-hwan (1980-1088) and, in Africa, Jean Bedel Bokassa (1965-1979) of the Central African Republic and Mengistu Haile Mariam (1977-1991) of Ethiopia.
In 1987, the military government of Chun Doo-hwan gave way to the country's first free and fair elections.
In May 1980, during the army-backed rule of Chun Doo-Hwan, Kim was thrown into prison on charges of treason.
It must have been unbearable for him to be compared to (jailed) military dictators like Chun Doo-hwan and Roh Tae-woo, against whom he fought hard.
North and South Korea have tried to kill each other's leaders during the Cold War era, but there have been no known attempts since 1983, when a North Korean bomb in Yangon, Myanmar missed Chun Doo-Hwan, the then-president.
Compounding the difficulty, the Korean government has acted recently in ways reminiscent of the chaebol heyday of the military dictatorships of Park Chung-hee and his successor, Chun Doo-hwan.
General Chun Doo-hwan, the leader of the coup, failed to recognize that civil-military relations in the United States were different from those in Korea and therefore incorrectly assumed that Wickham played a role in formulation of policy.
An appellate court overturned the death sentence of former military strongman Chun Doo-hwan on Monday, reducing his term to life imprisonment.
Under dictator Chun Doo-Hwan two private companies - TBS and Dong-A - wree forcibly merged and became the vast Korean Broadcasting System (KBS).