establishment

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establishment

[i′stab·lish·mənt]
(oceanography)
The interval of time between the transit (upper or lower) of the moon and the next high water at a place.
References in periodicals archive ?
The church establishments from the Holy Places, to which the Romanian monasteries were sacred, had the duty to watch their existence and maintenance, fulfilling all the obligations stipulated by their founders: maintenance of hospitals or asylums, schools, granting charities, so on, and for fulfilling all these requirements, they should have received a part of monastery incomes.
Taken from a conference 900 years after the synod at University College Cork and Cashel, the subjects include Canterbury's perspective on church reform and Ireland, Cork and Waterford as gateways to southern Ireland, the career of Muirchertach Ua Brian and his patronage of Saint Flannan's oratory at Killaloe, women and marriage in late pre-Norman Ireland, the question of whether Irish church establishments were under lay control, literary manifestations of twelfth-century reform, the construction and decoration of Cormac's chapel at Cashel, evidence of discourse between Germany and Cashel, the role of bishops in liturgy and reform, the portrayal of the Irish in Bernard's Life of Malachy, and Romanesque scholarship.
After the revolution, they pressed their opposition to the official church establishments and their support for separation of church and state.
Amicus secretary Chris Ball said: 'The senior figures from the faith and the church establishments are likely to oppose giving clergy employment rights, just like McDonald's and Burger King might be against an increase in the national minimum wage.
Under the aegis of church establishments, Baptists, Methodists and others had been horsewhipped, jailed even tarred and feathered for preaching without a license, which they refused to request, from states.
Roxborogh's book fills this gap, presenting a convincing portrait of Chalmers as an evangelical pragmatist whose attitudes on most of the contested questions of the day--from church establishments to the place of "civilization" in mission--were shaped by the priority of bringing Christ to the people of Scotland and to humanity at large.