Ciborium


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Ciborium

 

originally a drinking vessel; in Christian churches a tabernacle placed under the altar canopy. Later the altar canopy itself began to be called the ciborium; it was usually supported by columns and richly ornamented. The vessel or box in which the Communion wafers are placed is also called a ciborium.


Ciborium

 

in Orthodoxy, a type of church receptacle used to hold the consecrated bread of the Eucharist. Ciboria were usually made of silver and modeled in the form of a Christian church in miniature.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
References in periodicals archive ?
The female ciborium has lateral longitudinal and irregular rows of teeth.
95) The only surviving such shrine is the one surmounting the high altar of San Giovanni in Laterano, erected in 1368-70 to house the head-reliquaries of Saints Peter and Paul in the place once occupied by the famed silver ciborium of Emperor Constantine.
The ciborium dates back to about the 1930s and has spent most, if not all, of its life in the church.
Later, all sandflies were stained with 20% carbol fuchsin solution and then identified to species by microscope-based on some typical morphologic characteristics: mainly internal structures (such as hair on abdominal tergites, buccal capsule, pigment patch, pharyngeal basket and spermatheca, ciborium, pharynx for females and terminal genitalia for males).
Once more, too, Byzantine artists supplied plentiful models, including yet another illumination from the Menelogion of Basil II picturing an altar with arched ciborium within a church sanctuary, and a drawing of the presentation of the Christ Child in the Temple by an eleventh-century artist at Monte Cassino who grasped well the character of some East Christian antecedent.
I was in the portico of Saint Peter's Basilica, I had the ciborium with the consecrated hosts in my hands, and I heard that voice.
50) The abbess' position before the ciborium is suggestive of her personal ardor for the host, a type of piety that carried particular significance for female worshippers in the late Middle Ages .
Blarney PP, Fr Vincent O'Donohue, of St Mary's Church in Waterloo, Co Cork, said: "The safe was locked in the sacristy and I presume they were looking for money but we never leave money there - only our chalice, ciborium and pyx as well as the key to the tabernacle.
Among the not-to-be-missed treasures are an Early Byzantine ciborium (altar canopy) dating from about AD 500-600, the only such example from this period to have survived from the Middle East (Byzantium Gallery); opulent Imperial Roman jewelry (Rome and the Near East); and intricately inscribed shawabtis (magical figures) found in the pyramid tombs of the Napatan kings (Nubia).
The cup with the wine remained standing but the ciborium with the hosts was tipped over and the hosts were scattered.
This can be seen in the jewelled Primatial Cross of Canterbury, 1883, of silver and silver-gilt and also the jewelled ciborium, 1894, of silver parcel gilt from St Mary, Clapham, which epitomise the era.