chicory

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chicory

(chĭk`ərē) or

succory

(sŭk`ərē), Mediterannean herb (Cichorium intybus) of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), naturalized in North America, where the tall stalks of usually blue flowers are common along waysides and are known as blue-sailors. It is extensively grown in Europe for its root, which, roasted and powdered, is used as a coffee substitute and adulterant. Chicory is also used as a potherb and salad plant; the common type that is blanched for salads is witloof, or French endive. True endive (C. endivia), a salad vegetable since antiquity, is cultivated in several broad-leaved and curly-leaved varieties. It is also called escarole. Chicory is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
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chicory
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chicory

chicory

Leaves look like dandelion leaves, but the rest of the plant is quite different. Chicory (sometimes called "wild lettuce") has tall, almost empty stick-like stalks with light bluish purple flowers with thin square-tipped petals. When just starting as greens, the leaves look almost identical to dandelion, except maybe a red vein in the middle. Before this stem grows, you can tell the difference with dandelions by turning a leaf over… if the stem has little white hairs on it, it's not dandelion (which is smooth). The roots are used as a coffee substitute by roasting, grinding and brewing like coffee. The ground up root is a great probiotic food and source of fiber. The whole plant is edible. Diuretic, laxative, sedative, cardio-tonic (good for the heart), lowers blood sugar, used to help heal liver and gallbladder (jaundice, skin problems) Anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory. Use the greens, buds and flowers in your salad and put the ground up root in your drinks! Mildly bitter earthy flavor.

Enlarge picture
chicory
Enlarge picture
chicory

chicory

Leaves look like dandelion leaves, but the rest of the plant is quite different. Chicory (sometimes called "wild lettuce") has tall, almost empty stick-like stalks with light bluish purple flowers with thin square-tipped petals. When just starting as greens, the leaves look almost identical to dandelion, except maybe a red vein in the middle. Before this stem grows, you can tell the difference with dandelions by turning a leaf over… if the stem has little white hairs on it, it's not dandelion (which is smooth). The roots are used as a coffee substitute by roasting, grinding and brewing like coffee. The ground up root is a great probiotic food and source of fiber. The whole plant is edible. Diuretic, laxative, sedative, cardio-tonic (good for the heart), lowers blood sugar, used to help heal liver and gallbladder (jaundice, skin problems) Anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory. Use the greens, buds and flowers in your salad and put the ground up root in your drinks! Mildly bitter earthy flavor.

chicory

[′chik·ə·rē]
(botany)
Cichorium intybus. A perennial herb of the order Campanulales grown for its edible green leaves.

chicory

a blue-flowered plant, Cichorium intybus, cultivated for its leaves, which are used in salads, and for its roots: family Asteraceae (composites)