Cincinnatus


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Cincinnatus

(Lucius or Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus) (sĭnsĭnā`təs, –năt`əs), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Roman patriot. He was consul in 460 B.C. and dictator twice (458 and 439). According to tradition, in his first dictatorship he came from his farm to defeat the Aequi and Volscians, who were threatening the city from the east and southeast. He returned from battle, resigned his dictatorship, and went home to his farm. In 439 he came out of retirement to put down the plebeians. The separation of legend from history in Cincinnatus' story is impossible.

Cincinnatus

farmer-hero who defeated Rome’s enemies, returned in triumph, went back to his farm. [Rom. Hist.: EB (1963) V, 712]

Cincinnatus

Lucius Quinctius . ?519--438 bc, Roman general and statesman, regarded as a model of simple virtue; dictator of Rome during two crises (458; 439), retiring to his farm after each one
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Cincinnatus, he does not relinquish control, and a military dictatorship ensues.
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Cincinnatus (Editor's note: An ancient Roman leader born in 519BC after whom the US city Cincinnati is named) What would be your top Desert Island disc?
It became clear that not all dictators would be a Cincinnatus, but might rather be a Sulla or a Marius.
The view held by some that Trudeau was a reluctant politician dragged by his friends, like Cincinnatus away from his plow, into the hurly-burly of federal politics cannot be sustained in the face of the evidence presented here.
She often likened Ohio citizens, who came forward to preserve or clean up Ohio's waters, to the image of the great Roman General Cincinnatus and his troops.
Deeply rooted in the British civil-military tradition that remained skeptical of standing armies, British military professionals were expected, like Cincinnatus, to return to the plow after winning the war.
43) "[P]ermit me, sir, to ask," Cincinnatus asked Wilson rhetorically,
There is powerful, indeed iconic, imagery underpinning the appeal of the citizen-volunteer, a modern-day Cincinnatus who drops his civilian role in the face of emergency, fights fire, and then returns to his regular job.
But Bill's political temperament inclined more to Cincinnatus than Caesar--especially if one imagines Cincinnatus with a sailboat instead of a plow.