Cincinnatus


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Cincinnatus

(Lucius or Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus) (sĭnsĭnā`təs, –năt`əs), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Roman patriot. He was consul in 460 B.C. and dictator twice (458 and 439). According to tradition, in his first dictatorship he came from his farm to defeat the Aequi and Volscians, who were threatening the city from the east and southeast. He returned from battle, resigned his dictatorship, and went home to his farm. In 439 he came out of retirement to put down the plebeians. The separation of legend from history in Cincinnatus' story is impossible.

Cincinnatus

farmer-hero who defeated Rome’s enemies, returned in triumph, went back to his farm. [Rom. Hist.: EB (1963) V, 712]

Cincinnatus

Lucius Quinctius . ?519--438 bc, Roman general and statesman, regarded as a model of simple virtue; dictator of Rome during two crises (458; 439), retiring to his farm after each one
References in periodicals archive ?
After returning from the battlefield to well-deserved glory, Cincinnatus quickly took his leave to go home.
Contrary to all of the other characters, Cincinnatus is endowed with a flair that makes him aware of the vile man trapped in the soulless world.
The comparison of generals such as Washington and Putnam to the Cincinnatus legend represented one of the most important analogies to ancient Rome.
Cincinnatus grabbed the side in order to keep his balance, but the oarlock came off in his hand, and, neck-deep, among a thousand speckled flowers, he began to swim, got tangled, began sinking.
He is about to reactivate his Cincinnatus role and begin the quest to be a citizen-legislator in the United States Congress.
Pictured on the breast of the eagle is a medallion with "the figure of Cincinnatus being presented a sword by three Senators, and in the background his wife standing at the door of their cottage near a plough and other instruments of husbandry.
Early Americans revered George Washington as the embodiment of civic virtue, imagining him as the modern Cincinnatus.
Santos Banderas assures you that it will be the happiest day of his life when he can retire from public life and sink into obscurity to work his strip of land, like Cincinnatus.
Washington's occasional insistence on frugality and simplicity at his table, for example, were clearly part of his effort to present himself as a modern-day Cincinnatus, the quintessential republican citizen-soldier called reluctantly from his farm to serve his country.
Asked repeatedly whether he wanted to be PM, Mr Johnson replied: "If, like the Roman leader Cincinnatus, I were to be called from my plough to serve in that office I wouldn't, of course, say No.
Livy wrote a massive history of Rome, emphasizing men like Cincinnatus, who saved Rome from attack and then returned to cultivate his three-acre farm.
change his name from Cincinnatus to Joaquin, in honor of the fabled