Cinna

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Cinna

(Lucius Cornelius Cinna) (sĭn`ə), d. 84 B.C., Roman politician, consul (87 B.C.–84 B.C.), and leader of the popular party. Shortly after Cinna's first election, SullaSulla, Lucius Cornelius
, 138 B.C.–78 B.C., Roman general. At the height of his career he assumed the name Felix. He served under Marius in Africa and became consul in 88 B.C., when Mithradates VI of Pontus was overrunning Roman territory in the east.
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 left Rome to fight against Mithradates VI of Pontus, having received from Cinna and Cinna's colleague Gnaeus Octavius a promise to maintain Sulla's reforms. When Sulla was safely out of Italy, Cinna revived certain anti-Sullan proposals; the conservatives opposed Cinna and expelled him from the city. Cinna promptly collected Roman soldiers and Italians in S Italy, called MariusMarius, Caius
, c.157 B.C.–86 B.C., Roman general. A plebeian, he became tribune (119 B.C.) and praetor (115 B.C.) and was seven times consul. He served under Scipio Africanus Minor at Numantia and under Quintus Metellus against Jugurtha.
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 from Africa, and returned to Rome. Cinna and Marius declared themselves consuls, and a great slaughter of Sulla's followers took place. After Marius' death Cinna remained consul. When Sulla defeated Mithradates and set out for Rome, Cinna and Cneius Papirius CarboCarbo, Cneius Papirius
, d. 82 B.C., Roman political leader. He was consul three times (85 B.C., 84 B.C., 82 B.C.) and one of the leaders of the party of Marius. After the death of Marius he and his colleague, Cinna, gathered (84 B.C.) an army to oppose Sulla in Italy.
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 raised an army to oppose him, but before the civil war began Cinna was murdered in a mutiny at Brundisium. His daughter Cornelia was the first wife of Julius Caesar. Cinna's son Lucius Cornelius Cinna, fl. 44 B.C., was a praetor who expressed approval of Caesar's assassination.

Bibliography

See H. Bennett, Cinna and His Times (1923).


Cinna

(Caius Helvius Cinna), d. 44 B.C., Roman tribune. At the funeral of Julius Caesar the mob mistook him for Lucius Cornelius Cinna and killed him. He was probably the minor poet Cinna, a friend of Catullus and author of the epic Smyrna (of which fragments survive).

Cinna

 

a genus of plants of the family Gramineae. The perennial grasses have a creeping rhizome. The leaf blades are flat and broad, and the single-flowered spikelets are in a loose panicle. The upper glumes are linear-lanceolate and single-veined; the lemma is lanceolate and greatly flattened laterally. Below the top of the lemma are short pointed or sharp barbs. There is a single stamen. The genus has three species, which are distributed in the temperate belt of the northern hemisphere and in the mountains of South America as far south as Peru. One species—C. latifolia —is found in the USSR, growing in damp shady coniferous and mixed forests. It is a good feed crop.