circadian rhythm

(redirected from Circadian cycle)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Circadian cycle: Circadian clock

circadian rhythm:

see rhythm, biologicalrhythm, biological,
cyclic pattern of physiological changes or changes in activity in living organisms, most often synchronized with daily, monthly, or annual cyclical changes in the environment.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

circadian rhythm

[sər′kād·ē·ən ′rith·əm]
(physiology)
A self-sustained cycle of physiological changes that occurs over an approximately 24-hour cycle, generally synchronized to light-dark cycles in an organism's environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding the circadian cycle and how the body reacts to shift work is essential for making schedules, which can help employees adapt to non-standard work hours.
Zeitgeber time (ZT): A standardized 24-hour notation of the phase in an entrained circadian cycle in which ZT 0 indicates the beginning of day, or the light phase, and ZT 12 is the beginning of night, or the dark phase.
Moreover, genetic mutants lacking circadian cycles of rest and activity died more quickly on infection with these pathogens than normal flies did.
However, the authors point out that the circadian cycle operates normally in the absence of the cell cycle.
Other investigators studied the effects of a disrupted circadian cycle by offering alcohol solutions to rats kept under constant light or constant darkness (Goodwin et al.
After the first 24 hours, the circadian cycle continues to be affected, even without further consumption of alcohol.
This circadian cycle has profound effects on DGE in the liver.
She points out that Drosophila become arrhythmic in response to constant light and revert to a circadian cycle when light and darkness alternate again.
With respect to the 34 hour restart, FMCSA has correctly found in the past that requiring two nights of sleep would disrupt drivers' circadian cycle and add to more daytime driving in congested periods, again increasing crashes.
They hypothesized that periods of blue light, like daylight, can help regulate the sleep-wake rhythm, which is a behavioural pattern linked to the 24-hour biochemical circadian cycle of the hormone melatonin.
Furthermore, variation in circadian cycle for individual rats also makes comparisons of heart rate or blood pressure difficult.
Edlund explores the effects and impact of sleep deprivation and the principles of understanding monitoring one's 24-hour circadian cycle.