Circular Accelerator

circular accelerator

[′sər·kyə·lər ak′sel·ə‚rād·ər]

Circular Accelerator

 

(or cyclic accelerator), a particle accelerator in which the particles repeatedly travel through the same accelerating electrodes and move in orbits that are close to circles or spirals. (SeeACCELERATOR, PARTICLE.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Two beams of subatomic particles called "hadrons" - either protons or lead ions - will travel in opposite directions inside the circular accelerator, gaining energy with every lap before eventually colliding with each other.
Two beams of atomic particles called 'hadrons' -- either protons or lead ions -- will travel in opposite directions inside the circular accelerator, gaining energy with every lap.
To do this, they turned to Lawrence Berkeley's synchrotron, a circular accelerator approximately 65 meters in diameter.
So far, the procedure has worked only in a doughnut-size, circular accelerator, which the scientists developed over several years explicitly to determine whether crystal beams were possible.
Within the LHC, two beams of subatomic particles called 'hadrons' - either protons or lead ions - will travel in opposite directions inside the circular accelerator, gaining energy with every lap.
The European group is building a more conventional but gigantic circular accelerator, at a cost of more than $1 billion.
Bruker Advanced Supercon GmbH is focusing on low and high temperature superconducting devices, circular accelerator vacuum systems, beamlines, and X-ray optics businesses, as well as specialty superconducting magnets for physics, energy research, medical devices, crystal growth applications, etc.
Electrostatic accelerators that are also linear devices are mentioned briefly, as are some of the circular accelerators and their applications.