circular orbit

(redirected from Circular orbits)

circular orbit

[′sər·kyə·lər ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
An orbit comprising a complete constant-altitude revolution around the earth.
References in classic literature ?
For a time he remained crouching, and when at last he looked out again the little town was very small and travelling, with the rest of lower Germany, in a circular orbit round and round the car--or atleast it appeared to be doing that.
For decades, astronomers have wondered whether the solar system's circular orbits might be a rarity in our universe.
In September 2032 the spacecraft will be inserted into polar orbits around Ganymede starting with elliptical and high altitude (5000 km) circular orbits followed by a phase with a medium altitude (500 km) circular orbit and by a final phase with low altitude.
Earth and its siblings travel along nearly circular orbits in almost the same plane.
For circular orbits or nearly circular orbits there is a principal number n = m + 1 associated with the energy per unit mass quantization for a QCM state
Among the 42 papers here are discussions of the thermalization of pair plasma with proton loading, semi-classical isotopization of the Mixmaster universe, circular orbits in the field of a quasi-spherical source, the role of time gauge in quantizing gravity, neutrino mass differences from interfering recoil ions, and the extended nuclear matter model with a smooth transition surface.
In addition, all the planets seem to have almost circular orbits.
From Plato's erroneous promulgation that the planets have circular orbits to calculation in 2003 of Hubble's constant, Fraser (history and philosophy of science and technology, U.
SIGINT and comm/BFT missions are similarly ineffective from low Earth orbit (LEO) circular orbits.
The cosmos is both an abstract set of laws--the four elements, the perfect circular orbits, Platonic solids etc--and a particular history, a one-off event, a singular evolutionary chain.
Scientists believe solar systems whose planets have circular orbits are the most likely to harbour an Earth-like world containing life.
The Brockhaus Enzyklopadie, which he quotes, defines them as consisting "of ice crystals and presumably meteoric dust particles that revolve around its [Saturn's] equatorial plain in circular orbits.