protoplanetary disk

(redirected from Circumstellar disks)
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protoplanetary disk

[‚prōd·ō‚plan·ä‚ter·ē ′disk]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
gov/feature/jpl/nasas-k2-finds-newborn-exoplanet-around-young-star) NASA once likened to "trying to learn how people grow from babies to children to teenagers, by only studying adults" - astronomers are constantly on the lookout for young stars surrounded by a circumstellar disk, which, given time, can evolve into protoplanetary disks.
Before finding itself on the star, however, most of the cloud lands onto a circumstellar disk forming around the star owing to conservation of angular momentum.
One important consideration for planetary formation is the dispersal rate of the circumstellar disk of gas and dust around a host star.
The findings support the notion that at least some massive stars form as their smaller siblings do, by packing on infalling material from a circumstellar disk.
Though nearly all of the approximately two-dozen known light-scattering circumstellar disks have been viewed by Hubble to date, Beta Pictoris is the first and best example of what a young planetary system looks like, say researchers.
Among specific topics are a far infrared modulating spectropolarimeter, magnetic field morphology studied by multi-scale polarimetry in and around the filamentary dark cloud GF-9, light echo polarization for geometric distance measurement, testing the density of distribution of young circumstellar disks, and simulating polarized light from exoplanets.
Spiral arms of gas and dust may extend from the stars' disks to feed them with material from the circumbinary disk, thus contributing to the development of their circumstellar disks.
The chapters are grouped into nine major topics: molecular clouds, star formation, outflows, young stars and clusters, and circumstellar disks, among others.
Despite the depredations of massive stars, about half of the stars in Orion still show evidence of circumstellar disks, McCaughrean and O'Dell note.
Moreover, in addition to adding to the list of potential exoplanet sites, studying circumstellar disks, which consist of dust and debris left over from stars' births, can also provide vital clues to how exactly planets form - a scantly understood phenomenon.
Astronomers have identified LkCa 15's disk as belonging to a special subset of circumstellar disks whose members are possibly in transition from a pre-planet-building phase to a post-planet-building system.