Cistercian


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Cistercian

a. a member of a Christian order of monks and nuns founded in 1098, which follows an especially strict form of the Benedictine rule
b. (as modifier): a Cistercian monk
References in periodicals archive ?
The collection was short on medieval Cistercian writers, apart from St Bernard himself; later Cistercian writings, many of them little known, are mainly historical or documentary.
The interest was held at this out-lying grange of Neath Abbey as we walked in the shoes of the Cistercians.
The current Cistercian monks have been there since 1929.
Lester's Creating Cistercian Nuns: The Women's Religious Movement and Its Reform in Thirteenth-Century Champagne, the project to re-frame the dominant (and largely gender-blind) narrative of the Cistercian order's foundations is substantially advanced.
The Cistercians protected it until the monastery was suppressed during the Reformation.
The Cistercian Abbey was extremely powerful at its peak and reputed to own over 380,000 acres.
Tintern was the first Abbey to be built in Wales [in 1131] and only the second Cistercian house in Britain," he said.
In 1177 the wood was granted to Fountains Abbey in Kirkstall, Leeds, which was once the richest and most powerful Cistercian monastery in England.
First featured in these pages at project stage (AR April 2005), Pierre Thibault's new abbey for a community of Cistercian monks in rural Quebec is now complete.
In his Fountains Abbey he concentrates on one particular abbey, the one founded by the new Cistercian Order in 1132.
The dig began on July 6th with a blessing and turning of the sod by Abbot Father Augustine McGregor, the Cistercian Abbot of the larger Mellifont monastery, a predecessor of whom founded Bective over 800 years earlier.
Julie Kerr provides a picture of the importance of Cistercian hospitality in putting up travelers, which played an important social role and commanded favorable comment even after the suppression.