Cistern


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Cistern: Rainwater cistern

cistern

[′sis·tərn]
(anatomy)
A closed, fluid-filled sac or vesicle, such as the subarachnoid spaces or the vesicles comprising the dictyosomes of a Golgi apparatus.
(civil engineering)
A tank for storing water or other liquid.
(geology)
A hollow that holds water.

Cistern

A tank used to store rainfall that has been collected from a roof or some other catchment area, usually located underground. The water is generally used for watering lawns and gardens, washing cars, and similar uses, but it can also be used for flushing toilets and, with treatment, for all other uses. Cisterns help conserve water and prevent pollution of nearby streams from runoff.

cistern

An artificial reservoir or tank for storing water at atmospheric pressure (such as rain-water collected from a roof) for use when required.
References in classic literature ?
From the cistern we descended twelve steps into a large roughly-shaped grotto, carved wholly out of the living rock.
I wake up in the morning all bedraggled; there's a yellow fog outside; little Emily turns on the electric light when she brings me my tea, and says, 'Oh, ma'am, the water's frozen in the cistern, and cook's cut her finger to the bone.
The bedroom jugs and cans usually in their places at an earlier hour, were standing that night at the cistern.
Besides, the cistern did not contain one-fifth part of it; they must therefore give up this efficient means of deadening the shock of arrival.
And many a one who hath gone into the wilderness and suffered thirst with beasts of prey, disliked only to sit at the cistern with filthy camel- drivers.
Sometimes the head of a watery cone would topple on board and mingle with the rolling flurry of foam on the swamped deck; and the Nan-Shan wallowed heavily at the bottom of a circular cistern of clouds.
And not only were these four who had so short a time to live, the first to whom the dread of being burnt occurred, but they were, throughout, the most importunate of all: for they could be plainly heard, notwithstanding the great thickness of the walls, crying that the wind set that way, and that the flames would shortly reach them; and calling to the officers of the jail to come and quench the fire from a cistern which was in their yard, and full of water.
But no small cabaret for a straitened traveller being within sight, he had to seek one round the dark corner, where the cabbage leaves lay thickest, trodden about the public cistern at which women had not yet left off drawing water.
That commonest of village sights was lacking here--the public pump, with its great stone tank or trough of limpid water, and its group of gossiping pitcher-bearers; for there is no well or fountain or spring on this tall hill; cisterns of rain-water are used.
He gazed with wonder upon the fortifications which make this place the Gibraltar of the Indian Ocean, and the vast cisterns where the English engineers were still at work, two thousand years after the engineers of Solomon.
When they reached the water side they went to the washing cisterns, through which there ran at all times enough pure water to wash any quantity of linen, no matter how dirty.
In the next place particularly, that there may be plenty of water, and rivers near at hand: but if those cannot be found, very large cisterns must be prepared to save rain-water, so that there may be no want of it in case they should be driven into the town in time of war.