citadel

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citadel

the headquarters of the Salvation Army

Citadel

A fortress or castle in or near a city; a refuge in case of a siege, or a place to keep prisoners.

Citadel

 

the central, most heavily fortified part of a fortress; a fortress-type construction inside ancient cities. The citadel as a rule included the ruler’s palace, as well as administrative and religious buildings. Citadels were designed to suit the relief of the terrain and could be located along the fortress walls (Erkkalah in Merv), outside the city fortifications (Pendzhikent), or inside the city (Salah-al-Din in Cairo). Often the citadel was erected on a high man-made hill and dominated the city, for example, that of Aleppo.

citadel

A fortress or castle in or near a city, intended to keep the inhabitants in subjugation, or, in case of a siege, to supply a final refuge.
References in classic literature ?
We sauntered carelessly and unthinkingly to the edge of the lofty battlements of the citadel, and looked down--a vision
We left the Parthenon to keep its watch over old Athens, as it had kept it for twenty-three hundred years, and went and stood outside the walls of the citadel.
A French officer, returning from the advanced detachment, rode up to Murat and reported that the gates of the citadel had been barricaded and that there was probably an ambuscade there.
Thiers alone dedicates a few eloquent lines to their memory: "These wretches had occupied the sacred citadel, having supplied themselves with guns from the arsenal, and fired" (the wretches) "at the French.
I had gazed upon the fortifications and impediments that seemed to keep human beings from entering the citadel of nature, and rashly and ignorantly I had repined.
Consequently, the whole were soon assembled at the base of the citadel, on the open plain.
The impression made upon the visitor by this Gibraltar of America: its giddy heights; its citadel suspended, as it were, in the air; its picturesque steep streets and frowning gateways; and the splendid views which burst upon the eye at every turn: is at once unique and lasting.
The manoeuvres of half a dozen regiments were to be inspected by the eagle eye of the commander-in-chief; temporary fortifications had been erected, the citadel was to be attacked and taken, and a mine was to be sprung.