Citrobacter


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Citrobacter

[‚si·trō′bak·tər]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae; motile rods that utilize citrate as the only carbon source.
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9 Non-hemolytic streptococcus 6 Enterobacter aerogenes 5 Klebsiella pneumoniae 5 Candida 4 Proteus mirabilis 3 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 2 Yeast 2 Miscellaneous * <10 * Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumanii complex, Aerococcus, alpha and beta hemolytic Streptococcus, Citrobacter, Morganella morganii, Providentia stuartii, Salmonella enteritidis, Serratia marcescens Table 2.
Bacillus subtilis-mediated protection from Citrobacter rodentium-associated enteric disease requires esph and functional flagella.
He found that the most common intestinal isolates in adult frogs were Citrobacter freundii and A.
Induction of anxiety-like behavior in mice during the initial stages of infection with the agent of murine colonic hyperplasia Citrobacter rodentium.
coli 1109 76,1 455 41,9 1564 61,5 Klebsiella supp 200 13,7 266 24,5 466 18,3 Proteus supp 100 6,9 308 28,4 408 16 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 20 1,4 22 2,0 42 1,7 Citrobacter frundi 9 0,6 23 2,1 32 1,3 Edwarsiella tarda 7 0,5 6 0,6 13 0,5 Enterobacter cloacea 13 0,9 6 0,6 19 0,7 Toplam 1458 57,3 1086 42,7 2544 100 n = ureme sayisi Tablo 2.
Enterobacteria of the genera Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter and Clostridium are capable to ferment glycerol producing 1,3-propanediol as major product.
Coli in 6, Pseudomonas aeroginosa in 4, klebsiella in 4, enterococcus in 4, Morganella morgagni in 2, proteus spp in 2, acinetobacter spp in 2, Serratia marcences in 1, Citrobacter frendi in 1 ESBL in 1, and spirocet in 1 patient) and gram positive microorganisms were isolated in 33% of patients (Staf.
72%), Proteus vulgaris (33%), Citrobacter freundii (25%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7%), and 1 fungus species, Candida sp.
monocytogenes against a background of other Listeria species, Salmonella, Escherichia, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Hafnia, Enterobacter, Citrobacter and Lactobacillus.
Pseudomonas, Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Enterobacter cloacae, Flavimonas, Enterobacter sakazakii and Enterobacter aerogenes were among some of antibiotic-resistant isolates that researchers found from the vegetables.