Clamence

Clamence

haunted by guilt because he failed to respond when aware that a girl had jumped or fallen into the Seine. [Fr. Lit.: Camus The Fall]
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Clamence, the judge-penitent of Camus' The Fall, Harun can be an irritating monologuist, weaving digression and rhetorical flourishes in and around his obsession.
And when in the final "After," one of the "innocents" has killed to protect the others, the circle completes itself, evoking Dostoevsky's Underground Man and Camus's Jean-Baptiste Clamence, who sought to flee their guilt by reminding us of ours.
Advanced exercises will be demonstrated by French horsewoman and stunt rider ClAmence Faivre, 30, who has appeared with her bronze Portuguese stallion Gotan in many films and international shows.
Camus had underscored that demanding character as a condition of his own life, and he wrote it out in that long, autobiographical-seeming confession on the lips of the judge Clamence, the narrator of The Fall: "Let us dwell on these peaks.
61) In the latter, the complex character, Clamence, criticizes Sartrean existentialism, mocks "absolute freedom," as he understands it, and appears, amidst much else, to be portraying Camus's "working through," and perhaps past, his disorienting 1952 "break with Sartre.
In the course of five days Clamence tells the narratee his story, which is centered on a traumatic event (mentioned only in the third day of the narration): the fall of an unknown woman into the water.
It is a piece for three dancers, Italian Chiara Fulgentini, Zubaidah Sa'bu, from Holland, and ClAmence Galliard, from France.
Clamence fancies himself a "Judge-Penitent" who goes around the bars of Amsterdam to engage others in conversation about his own sinful life and then gets them to reveal their own culpabilities.
Camus' most unforgettable character, Jean-Baptiste Clamence in The Fall, who has gone through the process of self-apotheosis, realizes at the end of the novel that the only way out of the hell he has created for himself is to pursue a new baptism, a baptism in the waters of sacrificial love.
Like Camus, Percy employed this strategy to construct a subtle and densely layered tale that attempts to entrap both the "listener" and the reader in a complex web of sympathy, partial complicity, and judgment of the narrators, Clamence and Lance Lamar.
In Camus's text "Jean-Baptiste Clamence," the protagonist-speaker, refers to himself almost constantly.