Kerr, Clark

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Kerr, Clark

(kûr, kär), 1911–2003, American educational reformer, b. Reading, Pa., grad. Swarthmore College (B.A., 1932) and the Univ. of California at Berkeley (Ph.D., 1939). He was a professor of industrial relations at Berkeley from 1945 until 1952 when he was named chancellor. In 1958 he became president of the Univ. of California, building its prestigious system until 1967, when Gov. Ronald ReaganReagan, Ronald Wilson
, 1911–2004, 40th president of the United States (1981–89), b. Tampico, Ill. In 1932, after graduation from Eureka College, he became a radio announcer and sportscaster.
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 had him dismissed because of campus unrest. He became director of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, which called for a "bill of educational rights," and author of its report Three Thousand Futures (1970). His writings include The Uses of the University (1972) and The Future of Industrial Societies (1983).

Kerr, Clark

(1911–  ) university president, economist; born in Stony Creek, Pa. A widely published labor economist and labor arbitrator, he presided over rapid growth at the University of California (chancellor 1952–58, president 1958–67), coined the term "multiversity," and wrote the controversial Uses of the University (1963). He chaired the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education (1967–73).
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1982, we are told in an interesting aside, Clark Kerr, former chancellor of the University of California, made the statement, "Among the eighty-five institutions in the Western world established by 1520 that still exist in recognizable form are the Catholic Church, the British Parliament and seventy universities.
It is now a truism that to compete in what Clark Kerr in the 1960s presciently labeled the "knowledge industry," having one or more world-class universities is of the essence.
The standoff ended after 32 hours when UC President Clark Kerr agreed not to press charges and to appoint a committee of students, faculty and administrators to craft recommendations on student speech issues.
At the University of California, FBI files subsequently uncovered through the Freedom of Information Act show the bureau harassed Mario Savio, a leader of the 1964 Free Speech Movement; waged a concerted campaign to oust UC President Clark Kerr because FBI officials disagreed with his policies; and gave personal and political help to Ronald Reagan, who had been an FBI informer in Hollywood and as governor vowed to crack down on Berkeley protests.
Clark Kerr, one-time president of the University of California system, once characterized the university as "a series of individual faculty entrepreneurs held together by a common grievance over parking.
Clark Kerr saw to it that Stack was quickly made comfortable on the sofa in the drawing room and the guests alerted.
Struck by how many files were missing or blacked out ("I wondered whether the bureau was America's biggest consumer of Magic Markers," Rosenfeld writes), he filed an additional request for "any and all" records on former UC-Berkeley president Clark Kerr, former Free Speech Movement leader Mario Savio, and more than a hundred other individuals, organizations and events.
I count myself lucky,' he says, 'that the future Clark Kerr was trying to create at [Berkeley] took quite a long time to catch up with me again'; Kerr being the well-known advocate of the egalitarian 'multiversity' that would be a 'prime instrument of national purpose'.
8) Clark Kerr wrote about how one of the distinctive aspects of the American university was its engagement with a variety of external influences.
Anyone who has seen that superb documentary film of university protest, Berkeley in the Sixties, will recall the fiery antagonism between Mario Savio, a university radical, and Clark Kerr, a university administrator.
UC president Clark Kerr set out to recruit the finest university administrators to come to California to build a vastly enlarged university system.
Few authors have been as influential in shaping the discussion of the purposes of the university in the West as Cardinal John Henry Newman in the nineteenth century and Clark Kerr in the twentieth.