Classical German Philosophy

Classical German Philosophy

 

a phase in the development of German philosophy of the late 18th and early 19th century during which two successive schools appeared: German classical idealism, whose principal exponents were I. Kant, J. G. Fichte, F. W. Schelling, and G. Hegel, and the materialism of L. Feuerbach. The principal achievement of this period was the creation of the logic of development—the dialectic. The term “classical German philosophy” is used by F. Engels in his work Ludwig Feuerbach and the End of Classical German Philosophy. Classical German philosophy is one of the sources of Marxism.

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He is a philosopher by profession, he specializes in classical German philosophy and contemporary moral, political and social issues.
Classical German Philosophy and Cohen's Critique of Rawls, JULIUS SENSAT
The work of philosophical critical theorists such as Jay Bernstein and Peter Dews has begun to address the connections between Adorno and classical German philosophy in a way which had previously happened only in the German literature.
See Friedrich Engels, Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, trans.
The concluding lecture, "The French Revolution and Classical German philosophy," traces the correlation between the political upheaval in France and the genesis of classical German philosophy to the emergence of a new image of rational agents as autonomous, structuring institutions by principles of reason.

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