classical logic

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classical logic

(logic)
References in classic literature ?
I grant thee, Nathan, that it is a dwelling of those to whom the despised Children of the Promise are a stumbling-block and an abomination; yet thou knowest that pressing affairs of traffic sometimes carry us among these bloodthirsty Nazarene soldiers, and that we visit the Preceptories of the Templars, as well as the Commanderies of the Knights Hospitallers, as they are called.
degli Studi di Torino, Italy) are classical logics extended by a conditional operator usually denoted an arrow .
On the density of implicational parts of intuitionistic and classical logics, Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics, Vol.
Statistics of intuitionistic versus classical logics, Studia Logica, Vol.
Section 2 discusses classical logics in order to highlight their limitations in expressing temporal properties.
Classical logics can formalize the deductive process: given a set of true propositions, it is possible to verify if other propositions are a logical consequence of the early set.
The IDP System: A Model Expansion System for an Extension of Classical Logic.
It begins from an inferentialist, and particularly bilateralist, theory of meaning--one which takes meaning to be constituted by assertibility and deniability conditions--and shows how the usual multiple-conclusion sequent calculus for classical logic can be given an inferentialist motivation, leaving classical model theory as of only derivative importance.
It presupposes a good knowledge of classical logic and its model-theory, and also familiarity with the preferential semantics for systems of uncertain (aka nonmonotonic) consequence.
Finally, even the dialetheist can appeal to consistency in consistent situations, since classical logic is only a restricted form of LP.
This is demonstrated using a semantics according to which sentences may take some nonempty subset of the usual truth values, {t,f}, but otherwise life is as normal in classical logic.
Each chapter, including the opening one on classical logic, has essentially the same pattern, with only minor variations here and there.