Clavdia

Clavdia

thought Hans’s proposal foolish and refused him. [Ger. Lit.: The Magic Mountain, Magill I, 545–547]
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On Walpurgis-night Hans borrows a pencil from his beloved Clavdia Chauchat in order to draw a pig; the Gadarene imagery continues in Adrian's childhood home in Buchel, where he has a Bible bound in pigskin and reads verses by von Schweinitz.
suggested to Mann the long-awaited and finally consummated love of Hans Castorp and Clavdia Chauchat when the demons are let loose in the "Walpurgis-Night" chapter of The Magic Mountain.
While Castorp lingers, glimpses of eternal myths and archetypes well up in his mind: the fatal seduction of Helen, the femme fatale, in Clavdia Chauchat; the single combat of arch foes like Achilles and Hector in Naphta and Settembrini; the death and rebirth of Dionysus and of Christ through Mynheer Peeperkorn; Castorp's own epic quest for extraordinary knowledge in the realm of death.
16, 1918, in Omsk, Siberia, to Emil And Clavdia Nikolaevna Pabo.
Hans Castorp's memories of Pribislav are changed into his infatuation for Clavdia Chauchat.
A foretaste of his attraction to the careless East, as embodied at the Sanitarium Berghof by the Russian Frau Clavdia Chauchat.
The single event that changes Tintin from child/cartoon character to man is a sexual encounter he has with Madame Clavdia Chauchat, a promiscuous woman who belongs to the international set Tintin has fallen in with in Machu Picchu.
Unlike Tintin, however, these characters are rendered scrupulously true to Mann's originals: Herr Naptha is still a totalitarian Jesuit, Signor Settembrini still a democratic humanist, Herr Peeperkorn still a loquacious bore, and Clavdia Chauchat still a beautiful egotist ("To be with any less than the exceptional is a form of extinction") and a faithless lover.
He challenges the arguments of Settembrini and Naphta, consummates his passion for Clavdia, takes a dangerous but enlightening ski trip in the mountains, orchestrates the symbolic musical records, attends the disturbing seance and finally descends to the inevitable war.
And Whitman's "I Sing the Body Electric" inspired one of the greatest scenes in The Magic Mountain (1924): Hans Castorp's declaration of love to Clavdia Chauchat (a cat in heat) during the unconstrained revelries of carnival night.
Clavdia Chauchat, the heartbreaking heroine of Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain (1924), bears a striking resemblance to the cultured femme fatale Lou Salome (1861-1937).
Both heroes fall madly in love with an irresistibly beautiful Slav: Aschenbach with the young Polish boy Tadzio, Castorp with the Russian femme fatale Clavdia Chauchat, who reminds him of his boyhood love for another handsome young Slav, Pribislav Hippe.