Climax


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climax

1. a decisive moment in a dramatic or other work
2. Ecology the stage in the development of a community during which it remains stable under the prevailing environmental conditions
3. (esp in referring to women) another word for orgasm

Climax

A number of design ideas so arranged that each succeeding one makes a stronger statement than its predecessor. The final culmination or highest point is the summation of the process.

Climax

 

in geobotany, the final and relatively stable state of vegetation that results from replacement or succession (a series of successive replacements) of the plant cover.

The concept of climax was elaborated in detail by the American phytocenologist H. Cowles in 1901. The American botanist F. Clements considered climax a process equivalent to the individual development of an organism; he believed that for every large, climatically homogeneous territory there was only one final formation (one climax). However, a phytocenosis as a whole is not capable of multiplying and, moreover, the succession that completes a climax occurs on the basis of uniting heterogeneous elements (species) on a common territory and not on the basis of differentiation of a single organism, as occurs in individual development.

The concept of climax as a relatively stable state attained by vegetation in the process of its development in a definite place has both theoretical and practical interest. It permits forecasting the direction of the natural course of replacement of vegetation, which is important in planning meliorative measures and exploitation of forest, meadow, and steppe lands.

REFERENCES

Aleksandrova, V. D. “Dinamika rastitel’nogo pokrova.” In the collection Polevaia geobotanika, vol. 3. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
Shennikov, A. P. Vvedenie v geobotaniku. Leningrad, 1964.

A. A. URANOV


Climax

 

stylistic gradation, an intonational and syntactic sequence whose members are arranged in order of increasing significance (as opposed to enumeration, where they are of equal strength). For example,the lines of S. Esenin:

Ne zhaleiu, ne zovu, ne plachu,

Vse proidet, kak s belykh iablon’ dym.

I am not sorry, I do not call, I do not weep,

All will pass like blossoms from white apple trees.


Climax

 

the world’s largest deposit of molybdenum ore; located in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado at an altitude of 3,500 m. The deposit has been known since the end of the 19th century; exploratory work started in 1917.

The Climax deposit is located among very ancient Precam-brian granite, gneiss, and crystalline schist that have been separated by a major fault, the Mosquito fault, from the sedimentary Carboniferous rock that has developed farther to the west. The deposit arose under the effect of postmagmatic hydrothermal processes related to the intrusion of magmatic rock (monzoniteporphyries) along the stock fault. The deposit is zonal in structure. Its core, with a diameter of around 500 m, is composed of heavily crushed quartz rock with a minuscule molybdenum content. Around the core is a ring-like zone of commercial molybdenum ores 100 to 300 m wide; it has been traced to a depth of 500 m with drilling. The zone consists of hydrothermally reworked fissured intrusive rock broken by numerous mineral veins. These veins form a pipe-like stockwork. In addition to the widely developed molybdenite and pyrite, the veins of ore minerals have wolframite, cassiterite, and monazite.

The molybdenum reserves (with an average content of 0.4 percent) have been estimated at 1.2–1.6 million tons. The annual molybdenum output is 15,000–20,000 tons (1969). Tungsten, tin, and monazite and pyrite concentrates are also extracted from the Climax ores.

REFERENCES

Smirnov, V. I. Geologiia poleznykh iskopaemykh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1969.
Khrushchov, N. A. Molibden. (Otsenka mestorozhdenii pri poiskakh i razvedkakh, vol. 19.) Moscow-Leningrad, 1961.

V. I. SMIRNOV


Climax

 

the point or period of greatest upsurge or maximum intensity in the development of anything. In the arts (literature, theater, motion pictures) it is the most tense moment in the action (plot), the turning point in the protagonists’ relationships and conflicts, after which begins the transition to the denouement. In terms of content, the climax is an ordeal that brings to a head the problem treated in an artistic work and clearly reveals the hero’s character—for example, the scene in which a shot is heard in A. P. Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya.

climax

[′klī‚maks]
(ecology)
A mature, relatively stable community in an area, which community will undergo no further change under the prevailing climate; represents the culmination of ecological succession.
References in classic literature ?
It wouldn't take me much trouble to persuade Chad Cranage and half a dozen other bull-headed fellows that they would be doing an acceptable service to the Church by hunting Will Maskery out of the village with rope-ends and pitchforks; and then, when I had furnished them with half a sovereign to get gloriously drunk after their exertions, I should have put the climax to as pretty a farce as any of my brother clergy have set going in their parishes for the last thirty years.
THERE is a climax to everything, to every state of feeling as well as to every position in life.
Reaching the climax of passion, one sailor overturned the table and the money which was upon it.
I had taken hold of the door-handle meanwhile, intending to leave the room without reply; but I was panting with my run upstairs, and my exhaustion came to a climax in a violent fit of coughing, so bad that I could hardly stand.
The day following the coming of Vas Kor to the palace of the Prince of Helium great excitement reigned throughout the twin cities, reaching its climax in the palace of Carthoris.
It is still the beginning of the home epic--the gradual conquest or irremediable loss of that complete union which makes the advancing years a climax, and age the harvest of sweet memories in common.
He associated her now with all those plans concerning the future which he had been dimly formulating since the climax of his successes had come.
The tone in which she put the question told of excitement that was rising to its climax.
But Major Fitz-David's admiration rose from one climax to another with such alarming rapidity that I felt the importance of administering a practical check to it.
I rose to a climax of enthusiasm and worship, and, before he could guess my intention, threw my arms around his neck and kissed him on the lips.
On the Sunday evening--which was the evening before the marriage--the dullness, as a matter of course, reached its climax.
But we have not as yet touched on the climax of the difficulty; namely, the fact that the neuters of several ants differ, not only from the fertile females and males, but from each other, sometimes to an almost incredible degree, and are thus divided into two or even three castes.