Clocks


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Clocks

Big Ben
bell of Houses of Parliament clock in London keeps Britons punctual. [Br. Culture: Misc.]
Nuremberg Egg
first watch; created by Peter Henlein (1502). [Ger. Hist.: Gran, 223]
Strasbourg cathedral clock
famous clock in Strasbourg Cathedral. [Fr. Culture: NCE, 581]
References in periodicals archive ?
The period when the clocks are one hour ahead is called British Summer Time (BST).
To keep the clocks running, clock winders are needed and they work cheap, mostly paid only with the thanks they receive from a church or the town they live in.
The body's internal biological clock coordinates a host of rhythms--from hormone production to sleep-wake times--on about a 24-hour cycle.
Interior designer Karen Howes, of Taylor Howes Designs, likes to feature clocks as "wall art" and recently used an oversized antique-style clock as the focal point for an interior.
Sitting in his living room among an eyepopping collection of electronics, run by some 10 remote controls lined up on his coffee table, are the three clocks that he has labeled by manufacturer and system of timekeeping.
Wal-Mart, meanwhile, showed 27 clocks, retailing from $3.
The English bracket clock can trace its roots back to the mid 17th century and the popularity of these clocks ensures that they are still
The IDT CV115C PC clock satisfies the stringent requirements of the high-performance, next-generation desktop PC market.
Our most exciting development, BioScreen, is a computer that combines the functionality of a time clock and the smarts of a computer.
A single, ruling, and relatively egalitarian time which degendered hospitals by making men and women subject to the same temporal master temporarily superseded clock time.
In 1803, Eli Terry began using machines to mass-produce parts for inexpensive clocks.
Physicists in Colorado say that they've refined an innovative atomic clock to be more precise than the breed of clocks that's been the best for 50 years.