Cloudiness


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cloudiness

[′klau̇d·ē·nəs]
(meteorology)

Cloudiness

 

the amount of the sky covered by clouds. Cloudiness is determined visually. The extent of cloud formation is measured on a 10-point scale, with a value of 0 corresponding to a cloudless sky and 10 to complete cloud cover. The shape of the clouds is determined according to an international cloud classification.

Cloudiness is one of the most important factors characterizing weather and climate. In the winter and at night, cloudiness impedes the decrease in the temperature of the earth’s surface and the layer of air near the ground as a result of the reduction of radiation into outer space. In the summer and in the daytime, cloudiness lessens the heating of the earth’s surface by the sun’s rays, moderating the climate within continents.

cloudiness

The lack of clarity or transparency in a paint or varnish film.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the few cases of trade wind studies, the focus has been more on rain forming processes than on the factors controlling cloudiness and convection (Rauber et al.
Unlike in the western mountains, there is no strong pattern of windward cloudiness and leeward clearing here.
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Cloudiness foretelling the cold storm will creep in late today and early Monday, predicts the National Weather Service in Oxnard.
Weather is "the general condition of the atmosphere at a particular time and place, with regard to the temperature, moisture, cloudiness, etc.
Lortie's crispness of articulation was received with a disappointing cloudiness of delivery from Mozart's normally magical woodwind consort.
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What we have seen in our latest climate simulations is that the "Asian haze" is having an effect on the Australian hydrological cycle and generated increasing rainfall and cloudiness since 1950, especially over north-west and central Australia.