Cnidus


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Related to Cnidus: Lasea

Cnidus

or

Cnidos

(both: nī`dəs), ancient Greek city of Caria, SW Asia Minor, on Cape Krio, in present SW Asian Turkey. It was partly on the peninsula and partly on an island that had been created by cutting through the peninsula. One of the cities of the Dorian Hexapolis, it sought to maintain its independence but fell (540 B.C.) under Persian rule. It had a large trade, particularly in wine, and was also noted for its medical school and other institutions of learning. One of the most famous statues of the ancient world, Aphrodite by Praxiteles, was there. In the waters off Cnidus the Athenians under Conon defeated the Spartans under Pisander in 394 B.C. Cnidus retained its importance in Roman times and is mentioned in the Bible (Acts 27.7; 1 Mac. 15.23).
References in periodicals archive ?
The location of classical Cnidus is somewhat disputed.
idem, "Cos versus Cnidus and the Historians: Part 2," History
310-245) written in 275 BC after the model of Plato's disciple, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher Eudoxus of Cnidus (ca.
The most famous example of a lighthouse in the ancient world was the stone pharos at Alexandria, designed by the Greek architect Sostratus of Cnidus in 280 BC.
This sense of integration within oneself and with others has arrived as an epiphany quite soon in Forster's works--in this case, 1904, when the Demeter of Cnidus came back into his mind as "a private cult" (Furbank, Forster 1: 102)--and stands apart from the usual moments of natural panic that, as mentioned before, offer such a sensational change in his plots.
Yet even the most skilled of them will never be able to recover enough of the Pharos lighthouse (328 feet tall, allegedly)--designed for Ptolemy I or II by Sostratus of Cnidus and one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World--to reconstruct it persuasively, either on paper or in computer-generated image.
Glabrousness entered the canons, held by both cultures, of ideal human proportions and forms, demonstrating esteem for the hairless body in marble representations of Aphrodite (the Greek goddess of love, beauty, sexual rapture in the sense of both reproductive and non-reproductive sexuality, seduction, and fertility) including Praxiteles' Aphrodite of Cnidus [Knidos] (ca.
The accounts by Theopompus and Cratippus extended until Athens defeated the Spartan navy at Cnidus in 394.
For with this statue Praxiteles made Cnidus a famous city.
At the Dahesh, the exhibition begins with two of the icons of a French classical art education: the fragmentary Roman copies of Greek originals, one after Praxiteles' Aphrodite of Cnidus, the other a Polyclitus-type torso of an athlete or of Mars, acquired as authentic Greek sculptures by Ingres when he was director of the French Academy in Rome, and shipped back to Paris for the edification of the students.
The collection also houses the famous Great Bronzes of Octodurus, depicting the head of a three-horned bull, discovered in 1883, as well as some pieces of the Deleze Treasure, a replica of Aphrodite at Cnidus by Praxiteles, an Appolo.
Agatharchides of Cnidus is described in one place as the "famed grammarian to Alexander the Great," but later correctly dated to 120-110 B.