Cnidus


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Related to Cnidus: Lasea

Cnidus

or

Cnidos

(both: nī`dəs), ancient Greek city of Caria, SW Asia Minor, on Cape Krio, in present SW Asian Turkey. It was partly on the peninsula and partly on an island that had been created by cutting through the peninsula. One of the cities of the Dorian Hexapolis, it sought to maintain its independence but fell (540 B.C.) under Persian rule. It had a large trade, particularly in wine, and was also noted for its medical school and other institutions of learning. One of the most famous statues of the ancient world, Aphrodite by Praxiteles, was there. In the waters off Cnidus the Athenians under Conon defeated the Spartans under Pisander in 394 B.C. Cnidus retained its importance in Roman times and is mentioned in the Bible (Acts 27.7; 1 Mac. 15.23).
References in periodicals archive ?
310-245) written in 275 BC after the model of Plato's disciple, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher Eudoxus of Cnidus (ca.
He believed his colleague at the Plato's Academy mathematician and astronomer Eudoxus of Cnidus (408-355) who developed theory of concentric planetary spheres with various direction of movements of planets among which Earth took the central position.
The collection also houses the famous Great Bronzes of Octodurus, depicting the head of a three-horned bull, discovered in 1883, as well as some pieces of the Deleze Treasure, a replica of Aphrodite at Cnidus by Praxiteles, an Appolo.
Cnidus (or Knidos, now Cape Cris) is an island connected with the Turkish peninsula in the Gulf of Kos; in ancient times, the Greeks had created two harbours there to support an outpost of the Dorian confederation of cities.
94) Sir Charles Newton, A History of Discoveries at Halicarnassus, Cnidus, and Branchidae, 3 vols.
6), citing Agatharchides of Cnidus as his source (3.
Greek physician Ctesias of Cnidus had Written that India had fountains in which flowed liquid gold.
5) But we shall also consider in comparison the classical sources concerned with the use of Phoenician fleets by the Persians in other circumstances during the Persian period: for example, the battles of Eurymedon (466) and Cnidus (394), the campaigns in Egypt (454, 385-383, 373, 351, 343), and the Macedonian invasion of the Persian Empire in 333.
The Hellenica treated the period of Spartan ascendancy, terminated at the battle of Cnidus.