Coach


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

coach

1. a vehicle for several passengers, used for transport over long distances, sightseeing, etc.
2. a railway carriage carrying passengers
3. a trainer or instructor
4. a tutor who prepares students for examinations

Coach

 

(in Russian, omnibus), a multiseat horse-drawn vehicle used for transporting passengers; the earliest kind of public transportation, first introduced in Paris in 1662. In the 1820’s coaches were widely used in France and Great Britain; in the mid-19th century their use also spread to other countries of Western Europe and to the USA. They were also used in intercity transportation. Coaches ceased to be used in the early 20th century, when they were replaced by other modes of transportation.

In France the term omnibus is used to describe a regular passenger train, as distinguished from fast and express trains.


Coach

 

(in Russian, repetitor), in the cadet corps, corps of pages, and some other boarding schools in prerevolutionary Russia, the teacher who directed homework assignments.


Coach

 

a specialist in physical culture who offers training in his particular sport. A coach trains and educates athletes by helping them to master their skills and to develop their potential for competition. In the USSR, coaches are trained mainly at sport departments of physical culture institutes. In recognition of coaches who train athletes and teams that distinguish themselves at international and all-Union competitions, the honorary sport titles of Honored Coach of the USSR and Honored Coach of a Union republic have been established.

References in classic literature ?
For a moment they watched and then, as though to break a spell that hung over them, they began hurling the ball wildly about, and amid a se- ries of fierce animal-like cries from the coach, the runners of the Winesburg team scampered home.
Grose in a relation over which, on my way, in the coach, I fear I had rather brooded.
There was one passenger in the coach,--a small dark-haired person in a glossy buff calico dress.
I was to leave Gateshead that day by a coach which passed the lodge gates at six a.
The whole furniture consisted of a chair, a clothes-press, and a large oak case, with squares cut out near the top resembling coach windows.
A wheeled chair with luxurious cushions and robes which came toward him looking rather like some sort of State Coach because a young Rajah leaned back in it with royal command in his great black-rimmed eyes and a thin white hand extended haughtily toward him.
He reached the principal inn as the coach drove up, and was ready at the door to receive Magdalen and Mrs.
He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath.
While I was waiting for the coach in the hotel at Yarmouth that very afternoon, I procured a sheet of paper and an inkstand, and wrote a note to Peggotty, which ran thus: 'My dear Peggotty.
She was sitting," I answered, "in a black velvet coach.
To ride on that coach, as it gallantly staggered betwixt earth and heaven, was to know all the ecstasy of flying, with an added touch of danger, which birds and angels, and others accustomed to fly, can never experience.
A coach was allowed to Glumdalclitch and me, wherein her governess frequently took her out to see the town, or go among the shops; and I was always of the party, carried in my box; although the girl, at my own desire, would often take me out, and hold me in her hand, that I might more conveniently view the houses and the people, as we passed along the streets.