Coadaptation


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Related to Coadaptation: coaptation splint

coadaptation

[‚kō‚ad·əp′tā·shən]
(evolution)
The selection process that tends to accumulate favorably interacting genes in the gene pool of a population.

Coadaptation

 

the morphological and functional adaptation of organs to each other during the course of evolution; a form of correlation.

Coadaptation proceeds, using genetic changes, through natural selection of the most successful structural and functional organic interrelationships, at the same time assuring the adaptation of the organism as a whole to new life conditions.

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References in periodicals archive ?
australis may be an accidental consequence of coadaptation of this host with P.
Evolution and coadaptation of thermoregulatory behavior and wing pigmentation pattern in pierid butterflies.
The forum held a workshop in May 2008 on microbial evolution and coadaptation in honor of Dr Lederberg (www.
Evolution of insect-plant relationships: chemical constraints, coadaptation, and concordance of insect/ plant traits.
Key features contributing to the diversification and explosive radiation of Ericaceae in the Neotropics were: Pleistocene Andean orogenies, coupled with changes to cool and cloudy montane climates; physiological and life-form plasticity, including facultative epiphytism in more than half the species in the tribe Vaccinieae; preadaptation to colonizing open habitats; and coadaptation with nectar-feeding hummingbirds in Vaccinieae (Bleiweiss, 1998a, 1998b; Cruden, 1972).
This functional relationship among characters can generate genetic integration, or coadaptation of traits, by promoting linkage disequilibrium and/or favoring pleiotropic mutations.
Here, we demonstrate such interactions in crosses of inbred lines derived from a large, randomly mating, natural population of Pacific oysters, suggesting that the roots of nuclear-cytoplasmic coadaptation are present as intrapopulational polymorphisms.
In spite of its apparent simplicity, this idea has been extremely difficult to evaluate empirically, and coadaptation of host and parasite traits is usually assumed rather than demonstrated.
Coadaptation of the Clark's nutcracker and the pinon pine for efficient seed harvest and dispersal.
As different levels in the environmental hierarchy are transcended, variation in dispersal and invasion can affect population sizes, demography, and coadaptation, as well as food webs and assemblage structures (Tonn et al.
In the 1960s and 1970s people tried to demonstrate coadaptation of multiple gene loci by examining the fitness consequences of crossing different populations.