pneumoconiosis

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Related to Coal workers' pneumoconiosis: black lung disease

pneumoconiosis

(no͞o'məkō'nēō`sĭs), chronic disease of the lungs. Primarily an occupational disease of miners, sandblasters, and metal grinders, it is a result of repeated inhalation of dusts, including iron oxides (e.g., rust and filings), silicates (e.g., talc and rock dust), and carbonates (especially coal dust). Particles collect in the lungs and become sites for the formation of fibrous nodules. As the disease progresses, fibrous tissue increasingly replaces elastic lung tissue. Loss of lung function is signaled by shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and difficulty in expectorating. A heart deficiency called cor pulmonale may develop in severe cases. Sufferers are particularly vulnerable to infectious lung diseases such as tuberculosis. Pneumoconiosis is incurable and treatment is purely symptomatic. Because the inhaled dusts cause darkening of the lung tissue, the disease is also known as black lung. Silicosis, the form of the disease prevalent among miners, is commonly called miner's lung.

pneumoconiosis

[¦nü·mō‚kō·nē′ō·səs]
(medicine)
Any lung disease caused by dust inhalation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of coal workers' pneumoconiosis fell precipitously after implementation of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act and reached historic lows in the 1990s, with the most severe form, progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), nearly eradicated.
Profusion of opacities in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis is associated with reduced lung function.
Report of the Pneumoconiosis Committee of the College of American Pathologists to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: pathology standards for coal workers' pneumoconiosis.
201 (2000) (stating "[t]his definition includes, but is not limited to, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, anthracosilicosis, anthracosis, anthrosilicosis, massive pulmonary fibrosis, progressive massive fibrosis, silicosis or silicotuberculosis").
Pneumoconiosis refers to either coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) or silicosis, two similar, chronic fibrotic diseases of the lungs that can result from inhalation of coal-mine dust or silica dust, respectively.
To test our hypothesis, we used CWP prevalence data from the first National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis (NSCWP) (Morgan et al.
The study suggests ah interaction of genetic background with environmental exposure, and further suggests that intermediate responses are important in the development and progression of chronic pulmonary diseases such as coal workers' pneumoconiosis.
Known pneumoconioses include coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), silicosis, asbestosis, mixed dust pneumoconiosis, graphitosis, and talcosis.
Silica dust and coal dust can result in a more diffuse fibrotic process on the chest X-ray, rather than the more commonly observed or classically described discrete nodular lesions of silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis (15,16).
TABLE 1 Prevalence of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and progressive massive fabrosis (PMF) among examined noncontract miners *, estimated number of employees, and participation rates, by state -- U.