cryptanalysis

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cryptanalysis

[‚krip·tə′nal·ə·səs]
(communications)
Steps and operations performed in converting encrypted messages into plain text without previous knowledge of the key employed.

cryptanalysis

The branch of cryptography concerned with decoding encrypted messages when you're not supposed to be able to.

cryptanalysis

The art of recovering original data (the plaintext) that has been encrypted (turned into ciphertext) without having access to the correct key used in the encryption process. When new encryption algorithms are introduced, cryptanalysis determines how hard it is to break the code. See encryption.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stinnett's technical explanations of the intricacies and revelations from code-breaking appear persuasive to those of us unfamiliar with the field, but he has not fooled the experts.
Working with Shaftoe's son and granddaughter, Randy may have a source for that gold: the code-breaking efforts of his grandfather, who 50 years ago may have uncovered a Nazi plot to collect and horde German and Japanese gold bullion.
Budding spies were also given the chance to learn how to crack the case in a Secrets and Spies Code-Breaking Workshops, led by "Dr Maths", Steve Humble.
Quentin's journey takes him from Cambridge University to Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire - the heart of British code-breaking during the conflict - and he discovers the key role his father Bernard played in breaking a vital enemy cipher.
The collection includes the Roman Baths in Bath, the White Cliffs of Dover and the wartime code-breaking Station X at Bletchley Park.
Summary: The Second World War code-breaking centre at Bletchley Park will receive Au4.
What is the link between the dahlia, the code-breaking centre during the Second World fuchsia and the gardenia?
The demonstrators were believed to be from the UK Sangat group, which protests at alleged code-breaking temples.
From code-breaking to surveillance, eight to 16-year-olds will be able to hone their espionage skills on October 8.
James Radford, left, and David Johnson on the equator Roger Taylor reads his Echo in Tuscany Hyacinth Holder in Barbados with her daughters Jesrine and Margrita Vivien Roaslindo Nicholls with the famous Enigma code-breaking machine
The massive archive from the UK's code-breaking HQ will be put online over the next five years.